1920s

Vintage: Santa Barbara earthquake in 1925

Vintage: Santa Barbara earthquake in 1925

At 6:42 a.m. on June 29, 1925, the city of Santa Barbara was heavily damaged by a magnitude 6.8 earthquake. Thirteen people were killed and damage was estimated at $8 million. Few buildings on State Street escaped damage. Earthquake forced Santa Barbara’s 30,000 residents to face a night on the city’s lawns, in the public parks and along the beach.…
Vintage: Motor Racing from the 1920s-30s

Vintage: Motor Racing from the 1920s-30s

Donald James Harkness, pioneer in the Australian automotive and aeronautical industries, racing driver and record breaker, was born in Leichhardt, NSW in December 1898. On leaving school he became an apprentice in general engineering. At the age of 20 he secured employment at J.C. Hillier’s garage at Drummoyne and in 1922 the partnership of Harkness & Hillier Pty Ltd was…
Vintage: photos of Ku Klux Klan Parade in 1920s

Vintage: photos of Ku Klux Klan Parade in 1920s

The Ku Klux Klan was a secret organization; apart from a few top leaders the members never revealed their membership and wore masks in public. Investigators in the 1920s used KKK publicity, court cases, exposés by disgruntled Klansman, newspaper reports, and speculation to write stories about what the Klan was doing. Almost all the major newspapers and magazines were hostile.…
Vintage: General Strike in London, United Kingdom (1926)

Vintage: General Strike in London, United Kingdom (1926)

The 1926 general strike in the United Kingdom was a general strike that lasted 9 days, from 4 May 1926 to 13 May 1926. It was called by the general council of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in an unsuccessful attempt to force the British government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for 800,000 locked-out coal miners.…
Vintage: Prohibition in Boston (1920s)

Vintage: Prohibition in Boston (1920s)

Prohibition in the United States was a national ban on the sale, manufacture, and transportation of alcohol, in place from 1920 to 1933. The ban was mandated by the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, and the Volstead Act set down the rules for enforcing the ban and defined the types of alcoholic beverages that were prohibited. Prohibition ended with the…
Pacific Electric Subway opening celebrations in Los Angeles (1925)

Pacific Electric Subway opening celebrations in Los Angeles (1925)

Marking the beginning of a new era in transportation in Los Angeles, the city’s first section of underground electric railway was opened Nov. 30, 1925 with appropriate exercises, including a luncheon given by the Chamber of Commerce at the Biltmore at noon, and the operation of the first train immediately afterward. The passenger list included many city and county officials, H.W.…
Classic Motorcycles in the 1920s

Classic Motorcycles in the 1920s

In the ‘20s motorcycle development had continued apace, many bikes now sported internal expanding drum brakes, to slow the machines down properly. Many of the bikes produced in the ‘20s still supported the Flat Tank style of fuel tank and the sprung single seat. Passenger comfort was often restricted to a pad bolted onto the rear fender.
Vintage: Graf Zeppelin flying over Chicago in 1929

Vintage: Graf Zeppelin flying over Chicago in 1929

Ferdinand von Zeppelin was a German general and later aircraft manufacturer, who developed the Zeppelin airship. The design was patented in 1895 in Germany and 1899 in the U.S. Designed to carry passengers, the airship began commercial operations in 1910 through the company Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-AG (DELAG). By the middle of 1914, the craft had made over 1,500 flights and carried…
Vintage: historic photos of Peking, China (1920s)

Vintage: historic photos of Peking, China (1920s)

An older English spelling, Peking, is the Postal Map Romanization of the same two characters as they are pronounced in Chinese dialects spoken in the southern port towns first visited by European traders and missionaries. Those dialects preserve the Middle Chinese pronunciation of 京 as kjaeng, prior to a phonetic shift in the northern dialects to the modern pronunciation.
The Days of Prohibition

The Days of Prohibition

Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide constitutional ban on the sale, production, importation, and transportation of alcoholic beverages that remained in place from 1920 to 1933. It was promoted by “dry” crusaders movement, led by rural Protestants and social Progressives in the Democratic and Republican parties, and was coordinated by the Anti-Saloon League, and the Woman’s Christian Temperance…
High Life in Havana, Cuba

High Life in Havana, Cuba

It was during the presidency of Gerardo Machado in the ’20s that Cuba’s tourist trade really took off. Hotels, restaurants, night clubs, golf clubs and casinos sprung up in Havana catering to the rich jet-setters seeking luxury. Socialites, debutantes, celebrities like Ava Gardner and Frank Sinatra, and American mobsters came to play in the Cuban paradise. Tourism, and the growing and selling…
Images from “Safety Last!” (1923)

Images from “Safety Last!” (1923)

Safety Last! is a 1923 romantic comedy silent film starring Harold Lloyd. It includes one of the most famous images from the silent film era: Lloyd clutching the hands of a large clock as he dangles from the outside of a skyscraper above moving traffic. The film was highly successful and critically hailed, and it cemented Lloyd’s status as a major…