XX Century

Vintage: Christmas Trees in the past

Vintage: Christmas Trees in the past

The relevance of ancient pre-Christian customs to the 16th-century German initiation of the Christmas tree custom is disputed. Resistance to the custom was often because of its supposed Lutheran origins. Other sources have offered a connection between the first documented Christmas trees in Alsace around 1600 and pre-Christian traditions. For example, according to the Encyclopædia Britannica, “The use of evergreen…
Vintage: Santa Claus in the past

Vintage: Santa Claus in the past

In 1821, the book A New-year’s present, to the little ones from five to twelve was published in New York. It contained Old Santeclaus with Much Delight, an anonymous poem describing Santeclaus on a reindeer sleigh, bringing presents to children. Some modern ideas of Santa Claus seemingly became canon after the anonymous publication of the poem “A Visit From St.…
Vintage: Hoboken, New Jersey (Early XX Century)

Vintage: Hoboken, New Jersey (Early XX Century)

Hoboken was originally formed as a township on April 9, 1849, from portions of North Bergen Township. As the town grew in population and employment, many of Hoboken’s residents saw a need to incorporate as a full-fledged city, and in a referendum held on March 29, 1855, ratified an Act of the New Jersey Legislature signed the previous day, and…
Vintage: Moving Day (early 20th Century)

Vintage: Moving Day (early 20th Century)

For our parents and grandparents, some things were so much harder. Yet, other things were easier because they were less complicated. Moving day is never easy for anyone, but these old photos show us what it was like to move for past generations. Sometimes they were lucky enough to have a box for everything, but often wagons of trucks were…
Vintage: Everyday Life of American Jews (Early 20th Century)

Vintage: Everyday Life of American Jews (Early 20th Century)

Jewish migration to the United States increased dramatically in the early 1880s, as a result of persecution and economic difficulties in parts of Eastern Europe. Most of these new immigrants were Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi Jews, though most came from the poor rural populations of the Russian Empire and the Pale of Settlement, located in modern-day Poland, Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine and Moldova.…
Vintage: Early 20th Century B&W Nudes

Vintage: Early 20th Century B&W Nudes

Since the first days of photography, the nude was a source of inspiration for those that adopted the new medium. Most of the early images were closely guarded or surreptitiously circulated as violations of the social norms of the time, since the photograph captures real nudity. Many cultures, while accepting nudity in art, shun actual nudity. For example, even an…
Vintage: Elisabeth Bridge in Budapest

Vintage: Elisabeth Bridge in Budapest

The original permanent crossing, a decorative suspension bridge of chains, was built between 1897 and 1903, amid a corruption scandal. The Buda end of Erzsébet bridge runs directly into the massive foot of Gellért Hill, necessitating a complicated arrangement of roads to connect to the bridge. The bridge was designed in such a way because a wealthy nobleman, a member…
Vintage: Helsinki in the late 19th Century (1890s)

Vintage: Helsinki in the late 19th Century (1890s)

During the 19th century, Helsinki became the economic and cultural center of Finland; as elsewhere, technological advancements such as railroads and industrialization were key factors behind the city’s growth. The first Helsinki railway station opened in 1862 with service to Hämeenlinna. Beginning from the late 19th century, the Finnish language became more and more dominant in the city, since the…
Vintage: Los Angeles Retro Restaurants

Vintage: Los Angeles Retro Restaurants

We’re used to seeing swanky rooftop restaurants and bars, taco stands and outdoor patios decorated with lights in Los Angeles. But back in the day we had restaurants and food stands that took architecture to the next level, with wacky buildings shaped as actual items like tamales, hot dogs and planes. via LAist
Vintage: Kids and their Pedal Cars (1920s-1950s)

Vintage: Kids and their Pedal Cars (1920s-1950s)

Reaching the peak of popularity in the late 1920s and early 1930s, pedal cars experienced a resurgence in the 1950s to 1960s with chain-driven models. With postwar prosperity in the 1950s, pedal cars grew more popular and were available in all major stores. From the early 1920s through the late 1960s, pedal cars, like automobiles, were produced in many different…
Vintage: Early Days of the London Underground

Vintage: Early Days of the London Underground

The idea of an underground railway linking the City of London with some of the railway termini in its urban centre was proposed in the 1830s, and the Metropolitan Railway was granted permission to build such a line in 1854. To prepare construction, a short test tunnel was built in 1855 in Kibblesworth, a small town with geological properties similar…
Vintage: New Year’s Eve in Soviet Russia

Vintage: New Year’s Eve in Soviet Russia

During the Soviet period, religious celebrations were discouraged by the official state policy of atheism. Christmas tree and related celebrations were gradually eradicated after the October Revolution. In 1935, in a surprising turn of state politics, the Christmas tradition was adopted as part of the secular New Year celebration.
Vintage: Chicago – South Water Street

Vintage: Chicago – South Water Street

South Water Street was the city’s primary wholesale produce market until it was relocated in 1925 for the construction of Wacker Drive. Jammed all day long with oxcarts, wagons and horse-drawn carriages and weather-beaten men with rough hands and stained aprons and filled with the din of a cryptic language that few outsiders understood, the area, about 8 to 10…
Historic photos of The Chicago  ’​L ’

Historic photos of The Chicago  ’​L ’

The first ‘L’ began revenue service on June 6, 1892, when a small steam locomotive pulling four wooden coaches carrying a total of 27 men and 3 women departed the 39th Street station and arrived at the Congress Street Terminal 14 minutes later, over tracks that are still used by the Green Line. via Chicago Tribune
Vintage: Open-air bazaar in Chicago

Vintage: Open-air bazaar in Chicago

Maxwell Street first appears on a Chicago map in 1847. It was named for Dr. Philip Maxwell. It was originally a wooden plank road that ran from the south branch of the Chicago River west to Blue Island Avenue. The earliest housing was built by and for Irish immigrants who were brought to Chicago to construct the first railroads. It…