Vintage

Vintage: Victorian Era Portraits by Lady Clementina Hawarden (1860s)

Vintage: Victorian Era Portraits by Lady Clementina Hawarden (1860s)

Lady Clementina Hawarden (1 June 1822-19 January 1865) was a noted portrait photographer of the 1860s. Hawarden first began to experiment with photography in 1857, taking stereoscopic landscape photographs before moving to large-format, stand-alone portraits of her daughters. Much of Hawarden’s life remains a mystery to us. It is doubtful that she kept a diary as nothing has been discovered,…
Vintage: Portraits of Myrna Loy (1930s and 1940s)

Vintage: Portraits of Myrna Loy (1930s and 1940s)

Portrait photographer Henry Waxman had taken several pictures of Loy, and they were noticed by Rudolph Valentino when the actor went to Waxman’s studio for a sitting. He was looking for a leading lady for Cobra, the first independent project his wife Natacha Rambova and he were producing. Loy tested for the role, which went to Gertrude Olmstead, instead, but…
Vintage: Rock and Roll San Francisco by Jim Marshall (1960s)

Vintage: Rock and Roll San Francisco by Jim Marshall (1960s)

The counter-culture movement of the 1960s is one of the most endlessly examined moments of the twentieth century. Widely regarded as the cradle of revolution, San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury grew from a small neighborhood to a worldwide phenomenon—a concept that extends far beyond the boundaries of the intersection itself. Jim Marshall visually chronicled this area as perhaps no one else did.…
Vintage: Daily Life of Albert Einstein (1940s and 1950s)

Vintage: Daily Life of Albert Einstein (1940s and 1950s)

Einstein developed an appreciation for music at an early age, and later wrote: “If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music… I get most joy in life out of music.” His mother played the piano reasonably well…
Vintage: Iron Lungs for Polio Victims (1930s-1950s)

Vintage: Iron Lungs for Polio Victims (1930s-1950s)

In the early 20th century, polio was one of the most feared diseases in industrialized countries, paralysing hundreds of thousands of children every year. A highly infectious disease, polio attacks the nervous system and can lead to paralysis, disability and even death. The symptoms – pain and weakness, fatigue and muscle loss – can strike any time from 15 to…
Vintage: Everyday Life of Cairo in the 19th Century (1860s-1880s)

Vintage: Everyday Life of Cairo in the 19th Century (1860s-1880s)

Under the Ottomans, Cairo expanded south and west from its nucleus around the Citadel. The city was the second-largest in the empire, behind only Constantinople, and, although migration was not the primary source of Cairo’s growth, twenty percent of its population at the end of the 18th century consisted of religious minorities and foreigners from around the Mediterranean. Still, when…
Vintage: Young Tasha Tudor and Her Children (1940s)

Vintage: Young Tasha Tudor and Her Children (1940s)

Tasha Tudor (1915–2008) is one of America’s best-known and beloved illustrators. Her first little story, Pumpkin Moonshine, was published in 1938. She illustrated nearly one hundred books, the last being the 2003 release, The Corgiville Christmas. She received many awards and honors, including Caldecott Honors for Mother Goose and 1 is One. Many of her books are printed in foreign languages…
Vintage: New York City Manhattan Skyscrapers (early 20th Century)

Vintage: New York City Manhattan Skyscrapers (early 20th Century)

New York has architecturally significant buildings in a wide range of styles spanning distinct historical and cultural periods. These include the Woolworth Building (1913), an early Gothic revival skyscraper with large-scale gothic architectural detail. The 1916 Zoning Resolution required setback in new buildings, and restricted towers to a percentage of the lot size, to allow sunlight to reach the streets…
Vintage: Soldiers during World War I (1914-1918)

Vintage: Soldiers during World War I (1914-1918)

Despite the chaotic nature of war, the lives of soldiers followed relatively predictable schedules. Soldiers rose before dawn each morning, around 5 a.m. They performed standing drills called “Stand-to-Arms,” then received a daily ration of rum around 5:30 a.m. Soldiers continued performing standing drills until approximately 7 a.m., when they received breakfast. Breakfast for soldiers typically consisted of bacon and…
Vintage: Japan Daily Life by Arnold Genthe (1908)

Vintage: Japan Daily Life by Arnold Genthe (1908)

Arnold Genthe was born in Berlin, Prussia, to Louise Zober and Hermann Genthe, a professor of Latin and Greek at the Graues Kloster (Grey Monastery) in Berlin. Genthe followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming a classically trained scholar; he received a doctorate in philology in 1894 from the University of Jena, where he knew artist Adolf Menzel, his mother’s cousin.…
Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Oskar Jarén was born in Kasper Borg Frinnaryd in 1877 and died in his hometown in 1954. In 1960s all of his 2,000 glass plates were rescued from oblivion with the help of Frinnaryds photoclub. This collection documents daily life in Sweden from between the 1910s and 1920s. via JÖNKÖPINGS LÄNS MUSEUM
Vintage: The sinking and raising of U-Boat 110 (1918)

Vintage: The sinking and raising of U-Boat 110 (1918)

This collection is taken from an album of photographs found in the Swan Hunter shipbuilders collection at Tyne & Wear Archives. The album is from 1918 and documents the U.B. 110 before she was scrapped on the dry docks of Swan Hunter Wigham Richardson Ltd, Wallsend. The twin-screw German submarine U.B. 110 was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. On…
Vintage: Elisabeth Bridge in Budapest

Vintage: Elisabeth Bridge in Budapest

The original permanent crossing, a decorative suspension bridge of chains, was built between 1897 and 1903, amid a corruption scandal. The Buda end of Erzsébet bridge runs directly into the massive foot of Gellért Hill, necessitating a complicated arrangement of roads to connect to the bridge. The bridge was designed in such a way because a wealthy nobleman, a member…
Vintage: Aerial Boston (1920s)

Vintage: Aerial Boston (1920s)

The American Revolution erupted in Boston, as the British retaliated harshly for the Boston Tea Party and the patriots fought back. They besieged the British in the city, with a famous battle at Bunker Hill in Charlestown on June 17, 1775 (which was lost by the colonists, but inflicted great damage against the British) and won the Siege of Boston,…
Vintage: Boats of Old China (Junks) in the 1900s

Vintage: Boats of Old China (Junks) in the 1900s

A junk is an ancient Chinese sailing ship design that is still in use today. Junks were efficient and sturdy ships that sailed long distances as early as the 2nd century AD, although whether this is indeed a date by which the hull form which we know as the junk’s had found its final form is extremely dubious. Most scholars…
Vintage: Building the Tyne Bridge (1927 to 1929)

Vintage: Building the Tyne Bridge (1927 to 1929)

The Tyne Bridge is one of the North East’s most iconic landmarks. These photographs were taken by James Bacon & Sons of Newcastle and document its construction from March 1927 to October 1928. They belonged to James Geddie, who was Chief Assistant Engineer on the construction of the Bridge with Dorman, Long & Co. Ltd. of Middlesbrough. Photos from the…
Vintage: New York City in the 1930s

Vintage: New York City in the 1930s

The Great Depression, which was to affect the rest of the world, began with the Stock Market Crash of 1929. The recently completed Empire State Building would be known as the “Empty State Building” for many years because it could not attract sufficient tenants in the bleak business climate. When New York Governor Franklin Roosevelt becam president, the Hooverville shacks…