Photo Books

Eddy Van Wessel – The Edge Of Civilization

Eddy Van Wessel – The Edge Of Civilization

Photojournalist Eddy Van Wessel has journeyed time and again to conflicted regions in order to document the lives of people and refugees there. Bosnia, Gaza, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria have all been the subject of his award-winning photographs. This book offers an intimate and confronting look into the world of a conflict photographer. Through raw commentary, Van Wessel addresses…
Araki: Tokyo Lucky Hole

Araki: Tokyo Lucky Hole

It started in 1978 with an ordinary coffee shop near Kyoto. Word spread that the waitresses wore no panties under their miniskirts. Similar establishments popped up across the country. Men waited in line outside to pay three times the usual coffee price just to be served by a panty-free young woman. Within a few years, a new craze took hold:…
Michael Kenna: Forms of Japan

Michael Kenna: Forms of Japan

This beautiful book presents a meditative, arresting, and dazzling collection of 240 black-and-white images of Japan, made over almost 30 years by the internationally renowned photographer Michael Kenna. A rocky coast along the sea of Japan; an immense plain of rice fields in the snow; Mount Fuji towering over misty wooded hills; silent temples devoid of people but brimming with…
Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York’s Other Half

Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York’s Other Half

Danish-born Jacob A. Riis (1849–1914) found success in America as a reporter for the New York Tribune, first documenting crime and later turning his eye to housing reform. As tenement living conditions became unbearable in the wake of massive immigration, Riis and his camera captured some of the earliest, most powerful images of American urban poverty. This important publication is…
Christopher Thomas – Paris: City of Light

Christopher Thomas – Paris: City of Light

Imagine an entirely empty Champs-Elysees, or the Eiffel Tower minus the lines of tourists waiting to ascend. By taking advantage of the late night and early morning hours of a notoriously busy city, Christopher Thomas is able to capture familiar sights devoid of people. Using a large format camera, long exposures, and the last of his remaining duotone Polaroid film,…
Robert Adams: The New West

Robert Adams: The New West

The open American West is nearly gone. A longstanding classic of photobook publishing, The New West is a photographic essay about what came to fill it-freeways, tract homes, low-rise business buildings and signs. In five sequences of pictures taken along the front wall of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, Robert Adams has documented a representative sampling of the whole suburban Southwest.…
Eli Reed: Black in America

Eli Reed: Black in America

Eli Reed has been documenting the black experience in America from the time he began taking pictures. This volume, “Black in America”, is his provocative and often poignant portrait of black life in America. As a photographer, Reed is known for his unflinching coverage of events both large an small. Here we see tender moments between parents and children contrasted…
Guido Argentini: Argentum

Guido Argentini: Argentum

Color and texture radically influence how we perceive shapes. While looking for an innovative approach on a 1995 Miami photo shoot, photographic master Guido Argentini was moved to coat a model in silver makeup. The result was as beautiful as it was intriguing– the subtly grayish tones highlighted angles and surfaces in a way that was other-worldly. Inspired by the…
David Parker: Myths and Landscape

David Parker: Myths and Landscape

Myths and legends have often been inspired and shaped by geologic landforms and, similarly, British photographer David Parker uses the natural world as an arena for the personal exploration of new mythic, symbolic, and metaphoric motifs. Myths and Landscape brings together images from Sirens and New Desert Myths, two larger projects created in parallel and sharing a common esthetic. For…
Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album-vintage Prints from the Sixties

Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album-vintage Prints from the Sixties

Lying hidden away in Dennis Hopper’s home until their discovery months after the artist’s death in 2010, this collection of spectacular photographs, exhibited only once in 1969 – 70 at the Fort Worth Art Center Museum, is a testament to Hopper’s prolific and enormous talent behind the camera. These photographs are spontaneous, intimate, poetic, observant, and decidedly political. While some…
Alec Soth: Georgia Dispatch

Alec Soth: Georgia Dispatch

Over two sweltering, bug-swarming weeks in July 2014 the LBM Dispatch crew (superbly assisted by Stephen Milner and Brett Schenning) covered 2,400 miles in Georgia, exploring the State’s diverse landscapes, histories, and narratives that were alternately harrowing and inspiring. From the Civil War to the last beleaguered Gullah Geechee community on Sapelo Island, the result is a sort of see-sawing…
Xavier Guardans: Windows

Xavier Guardans: Windows

Windows is the debut volume of photographer Xavier Guardans (born 1954), produced in 2006 while exploring the Kenyan wilderness. These black-and-white portraits of individuals from a variety of Kenyan tribes–including Turkana, Samburu, Masai, Rendille, Gabra and Pokot–were shot through the window of Guardans’ Toyota Land Cruiser. The background is empty (only bright white light outlines each individual), while the dark…
Beate Gutschow: S

Beate Gutschow: S

At first glance, the large-format black-and-white photographs by Beate Gütschow are reminiscent of authentic documentations of urban scenes: monumental architecture, decaying buildings, rusty automobile parts. Yet the images are the result of complex digital manipulation: they are montages consisting of numerous photos taken by Gütschow on her various journeys and later assembled to create a single picture. They are often…
Christopher Thomas: New York Sleeps

Christopher Thomas: New York Sleeps

Imagine a New York devoid of people, its empty streets, bridges and waterways as silent and magnificent as an Ansel Adams landscape. This is the New York that Christopher Thomas reveals in duotone photographs that are at once haunting and nostalgic. Employing a large-format Polaroid camera, Thomas shot many of these images in the early hours of the day or…
Don McCullin: Retrospective

Don McCullin: Retrospective

First published in 2001, this retrospective survey offers both an examination of Don McCullin’s photographic career as well as a record of half a century of international conflict. Coinciding with the photographer’s eightieth birthday, this expanded edition of Don McCullin serves as fitting homage to a photographer who dedicated his life to the front line in order to deliver compassionate…
Laurent Baheux: The Family Album of Wild Africa

Laurent Baheux: The Family Album of Wild Africa

Within Laurent Baheux lies a burning desire to preserve nature’s primitive spectacle and take action for the protection of animals, which he does by breathing soul and individuality into his subjects. In The Family Album of Wild Africa, he portrays the intimate bond between the mammals of the Dark Continent and the human race. By emphasising an expression or a posture,…
Emil Otto Hoppé: The German Work

Emil Otto Hoppé: The German Work

Between 1925 and 1938, photographer E.O. Hoppé traveled the length and breadth of Germany, recording people and places at one of the most tumultuous times in the country’s history. He photographed movie stars and captains of industry, workers and peasants, and captured the birth of the Autobahn and UFA film studios in its heyday. He saw the rise of fascism,…
Chien-Chi Chang: Jet Lag

Chien-Chi Chang: Jet Lag

“Today is Monday, so this must be Zurich.” For those who travel a lot, the world becomes a steel-and-concrete construct of interchangeable flight crews, hotel rooms, and check-in counters. In this jet-setting life, the most important thing is that the power adapter fits. For Jet Lag, award-winning photographer Chien-Chi Chang (born 1961 in Taiwan) has created succinct black-and-white images of…
Roger Ballen: Animal Abstraction

Roger Ballen: Animal Abstraction

Animal Abstraction collects one body of work by photographer Roger Ballen (born 1950). Enigmatic, beautiful and often disturbing, these black-and-white photographs are staged in desolate interiors where humans interact with animals to create mysterious tableaux that reflect Ballen’s fascination with the animal kingdom. Roger Ballen Animal Abstraction Publisher: Reflex Editions (2012) ISBN-13: 978-9071848001 Hardcover: 100 pages Order the book: www.rogerballen.com/animal-abstraction
Lee Friedlander: America by Car

Lee Friedlander: America by Car

Enduring icons of American culture, the car and the highway remain vital as auguries of adventure and discovery, and a means by which to take in the country’s vast scale. Lee Friedlander is the first photographer to make the car an actual “form” for making photographs. Driving across most of the country’s 50 states in an ordinary rental car, Friedlander…