Photo Books

Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album-vintage Prints from the Sixties

Dennis Hopper: The Lost Album-vintage Prints from the Sixties

Lying hidden away in Dennis Hopper’s home until their discovery months after the artist’s death in 2010, this collection of spectacular photographs, exhibited only once in 1969 – 70 at the Fort Worth Art Center Museum, is a testament to Hopper’s prolific and enormous talent behind the camera. These photographs are spontaneous, intimate, poetic, observant, and decidedly political. While some…
Alec Soth: Georgia Dispatch

Alec Soth: Georgia Dispatch

Over two sweltering, bug-swarming weeks in July 2014 the LBM Dispatch crew (superbly assisted by Stephen Milner and Brett Schenning) covered 2,400 miles in Georgia, exploring the State’s diverse landscapes, histories, and narratives that were alternately harrowing and inspiring. From the Civil War to the last beleaguered Gullah Geechee community on Sapelo Island, the result is a sort of see-sawing…
Xavier Guardans: Windows

Xavier Guardans: Windows

Windows is the debut volume of photographer Xavier Guardans (born 1954), produced in 2006 while exploring the Kenyan wilderness. These black-and-white portraits of individuals from a variety of Kenyan tribes–including Turkana, Samburu, Masai, Rendille, Gabra and Pokot–were shot through the window of Guardans’ Toyota Land Cruiser. The background is empty (only bright white light outlines each individual), while the dark…
Beate Gutschow: S

Beate Gutschow: S

At first glance, the large-format black-and-white photographs by Beate Gütschow are reminiscent of authentic documentations of urban scenes: monumental architecture, decaying buildings, rusty automobile parts. Yet the images are the result of complex digital manipulation: they are montages consisting of numerous photos taken by Gütschow on her various journeys and later assembled to create a single picture. They are often…
Christopher Thomas: New York Sleeps

Christopher Thomas: New York Sleeps

Imagine a New York devoid of people, its empty streets, bridges and waterways as silent and magnificent as an Ansel Adams landscape. This is the New York that Christopher Thomas reveals in duotone photographs that are at once haunting and nostalgic. Employing a large-format Polaroid camera, Thomas shot many of these images in the early hours of the day or…
Don McCullin: Retrospective

Don McCullin: Retrospective

First published in 2001, this retrospective survey offers both an examination of Don McCullin’s photographic career as well as a record of half a century of international conflict. Coinciding with the photographer’s eightieth birthday, this expanded edition of Don McCullin serves as fitting homage to a photographer who dedicated his life to the front line in order to deliver compassionate…
Laurent Baheux: The Family Album of Wild Africa

Laurent Baheux: The Family Album of Wild Africa

Within Laurent Baheux lies a burning desire to preserve nature’s primitive spectacle and take action for the protection of animals, which he does by breathing soul and individuality into his subjects. In The Family Album of Wild Africa, he portrays the intimate bond between the mammals of the Dark Continent and the human race. By emphasising an expression or a posture,…
Emil Otto Hoppé: The German Work

Emil Otto Hoppé: The German Work

Between 1925 and 1938, photographer E.O. Hoppé traveled the length and breadth of Germany, recording people and places at one of the most tumultuous times in the country’s history. He photographed movie stars and captains of industry, workers and peasants, and captured the birth of the Autobahn and UFA film studios in its heyday. He saw the rise of fascism,…
Chien-Chi Chang: Jet Lag

Chien-Chi Chang: Jet Lag

“Today is Monday, so this must be Zurich.” For those who travel a lot, the world becomes a steel-and-concrete construct of interchangeable flight crews, hotel rooms, and check-in counters. In this jet-setting life, the most important thing is that the power adapter fits. For Jet Lag, award-winning photographer Chien-Chi Chang (born 1961 in Taiwan) has created succinct black-and-white images of…
Roger Ballen: Animal Abstraction

Roger Ballen: Animal Abstraction

Animal Abstraction collects one body of work by photographer Roger Ballen (born 1950). Enigmatic, beautiful and often disturbing, these black-and-white photographs are staged in desolate interiors where humans interact with animals to create mysterious tableaux that reflect Ballen’s fascination with the animal kingdom. Roger Ballen Animal Abstraction Publisher: Reflex Editions (2012) ISBN-13: 978-9071848001 Hardcover: 100 pages Order the book: www.rogerballen.com/animal-abstraction
Lee Friedlander: America by Car

Lee Friedlander: America by Car

Enduring icons of American culture, the car and the highway remain vital as auguries of adventure and discovery, and a means by which to take in the country’s vast scale. Lee Friedlander is the first photographer to make the car an actual “form” for making photographs. Driving across most of the country’s 50 states in an ordinary rental car, Friedlander…
Tim Rudman: ICELAND. An Uneasy Calm

Tim Rudman: ICELAND. An Uneasy Calm

Iceland has become a hugely popular destination for photographers around the world. Now ‘Iceland. An Uneasy Calm’ presents 98 reproductions of toned silver gelatine prints taken and printed over the last eight years by Tim Rudman, described by Ilford Photo / Harman Technology as “one of the very finest landscape photographers working today, easily identifiable by his supreme gift as one of the leading…
Alex Majoli and Paolo Pellegrin: Congo

Alex Majoli and Paolo Pellegrin: Congo

In this sumptuously printed, large-format publication, distinguished Magnum photographers Paolo Pellegrin and Alex Majoli present a collaborative document of the Congo and its people. Bringing together the best of each photographer’s personal styles as well as experimental forays into abstraction and collage, this volume captures what Alain Mabanckou describes as a full range of the landscape, “from urban scenes to…
Sebastião Salgado: GENESIS

Sebastião Salgado: GENESIS

On a very fortuitous day in 1970, 26-year-old Sebastião Salgado held a camera for the first time. When he looked through the viewfinder, he experienced a revelation: suddenly life made sense. From that day onward though it took years of hard work before he had the experience to earn his living as a photographer the camera became his tool for…
Valerio Bispuri – ENCERRADOS: 10 years, 74 prisons

Valerio Bispuri – ENCERRADOS: 10 years, 74 prisons

Encerrados is a long voyage lasted ten years, through 74 prisons across all the Latin American countries; a journey born from the desire to recount a continent through prisoners’ world. Prisons are a reflection of society, a mirror of what is happening in a country, from small dramas to the great social and economic crises. The prison is a community,…
Ryan Spencer: Such Mean Estate

Ryan Spencer: Such Mean Estate

Disaster can be explosive and theatrical or quiet and ominous. The photographs that make up Such Mean Estate are images appropriated from films about apocalypse. However, rather than a survey of disaster movies, they create a narrative from specific frames whose contents range from high drama to the banal. When taken as a whole, the conjunctions and themes of the…
Chris McCaw: Sunburn

Chris McCaw: Sunburn

The photographs of Chris McCaw (born 1971) are produced with various hand-built view cameras as big as 30 by 40 inches, which are equipped with large aerial lenses designed to allow a maximum amount of light to pass through. Using large paper negatives, McCaw makes very long exposures ranging from several hours to a full day, which result in solarized…
Jose Diniz: Periscope

Jose Diniz: Periscope

For eight years, photographer Jose Diniz searched the Brazilian coastline as a castaway. All the way from Maranhão to Rio Grande do Sul – extending through Uruguay – he captured images of people, buildings, the horizon and the sea always from a particular perspective: facing, under or over the water. Contrary to what many might think, Diniz did not use…
Josef Koudelka: Exiles

Josef Koudelka: Exiles

About Exiles, Cornell Capa once wrote, “Koudelka’s unsentimental, stark, brooding, intensely human imagery reflects his own spirit, the very essence of an exile who is at home wherever his wandering body finds haven in the night. ” In this newly revised and expanded edition of the 1988 classic, which includes ten new images and a new commentary with Robert Delpire,…
Misha Gordin: Crowd and Shadows of the Dream

Misha Gordin: Crowd and Shadows of the Dream

21st Editions brings together two distinct bodies of work from one of the most fascinating photographers we have ever published. In Crowd, Misha Gordin’s variations on the theme are at once subtle and yet universally appealing. Quietly powerful, graphically dynamic, Gordin’s silent figures compel the mind to explore not only the viewer’s own meanings, but those of humanity writ large.…