Vintage: R.M.S. “Mauretania” (1906)

Vintage: R.M.S. “Mauretania” (1906)

MonoVisions Black & White Photo Contest

RMS Mauretania was an ocean liner designed by Leonard Peskett and built by Wigham Richardson and Swan Hunter for the British Cunard Line, launched on the afternoon of 20 September 1906.

Mauretania departed Liverpool on her maiden voyage on 16 November 1907 under the command of Captain John Pritchard, and on the return voyage captured the record for the fastest eastbound crossing of the Atlantic, with an average speed of 23.69 knots (43.87 km/h; 27.26 mph). In September 1909, Mauretania captured the Blue Riband for the fastest westbound crossing — a record that was to stand for more than two decades. In December 1911, as in New York City in December 1910, Mauretania broke loose from her moorings while in the River Mersey and sustained damage that caused the cancellation of her special speedy Christmas voyage to New York. In a quick change of events Cunard rescheduled Mauretania’s voyage for Lusitania, which had just returned from New York, under the command of Captain James Charles. Lusitania completed Christmas crossings for Mauretania, carrying revellers back to New York. Mauretania was on a westbound voyage from Liverpool to New York, beginning 10 April 1912, and was docked at Queenstown, Ireland, at the time of the RMS Titanic disaster. Mauretania was transporting Titanic’s cargo manifest carried by registered mail. Travelling on Mauretania at the time was the chairman of the Cunard line, Mr A.A. Booth, who organised a vigil for the Titanic victims. In the spring of 1913 westbound transatlantic passage aboard Mauretania cost roughly $17 for third class passengers, as shown in the original ticket at right.
3rd class ticket on Mauretania, 1913

In July 1913 King George and Queen Mary were given a special tour of Mauretania, then Britain’s fastest merchant vessel, adding further distinction to the ship’s reputation. On 26 January 1914, while Mauretania was in the middle of annual refit in Liverpool, four men were killed and six injured when a gas cylinder exploded while they were working on one of her steam turbines. Damage to the ship was minimal; she was repaired in the new Gladstone drydock and returned to service two months later.

En suite rooms, A. deck, circa 1906

En suite rooms, A. deck, circa 1906

First class smoking room, circa 1906

First class smoking room, circa 1906

Library, looking across the vessel, circa 1906

Library, looking across the vessel, circa 1906

Lounge or music room, looking aft, circa 1906

Lounge or music room, looking aft, circa 1906

Lounge or music room, looking forward, circa 1906

Lounge or music room, looking forward, circa 1906

Mauretania kitchen, circa 1906

Mauretania kitchen, circa 1906

Mauretania observation hall, circa 1906

Mauretania observation hall, circa 1906

Ordinary state room, D deck, circa 1906

Ordinary state room, D deck, circa 1906

At full speed on the measured mile, circa 1906

At full speed on the measured mile, circa 1906

Parlour suite. B deck, circa 1906

Parlour suite. B deck, circa 1906

Promenade deck, circa 1906

Promenade deck, circa 1906

Purser's Bureau, on the Promenade Deck, Mauretania, circa 1906

Purser’s Bureau, on the Promenade Deck, Mauretania, circa 1906

Regal suite bedrooms, starboard side, looking aft, circa 1906

Regal suite bedrooms, starboard side, looking aft, circa 1906

Regal Suite parlour, circa 1906

Regal Suite parlour, circa 1906

Seat in grand entrance. A. deck, circa 1906

Seat in grand entrance. A. deck, circa 1906

Second class lounge, circa 1906

Second class lounge, circa 1906

Grand entrance. A. deck, 1906

Grand entrance. A. deck, 1906

Bookcase in library, circa 1906

Bookcase in library, circa 1906

Children's room, circa 1906

Children’s room, circa 1906

via SMU Libraries Digital Collections


Comments

comments

MonoVisions Black & White Photo Contest