London

Historic B&W photos of London, England (19th Century)

Historic B&W photos of London, England (19th Century)

London was the world’s largest city from about 1831 to 1925. London’s overcrowded conditions led to cholera epidemics, claiming 14,000 lives in 1848, and 6,000 in 1866. Rising traffic congestion led to the creation of the world’s first local urban rail network. The Metropolitan Board of Works oversaw infrastructure expansion in the capital and some of the surrounding counties; it…
Vintage: Everyday Life in London by Bill Brandt (1930s)

Vintage: Everyday Life in London by Bill Brandt (1930s)

Born in Hamburg, Germany, son of a British father and German mother, Bill Brandt grew up during World War I, during which his father, who had lived in Germany since the age of five, was interned for six months by the Germans as a British citizen. Brandt later disowned his German heritage and would claim he was born in South…
Vintage: London in the 1950s by Roger Mayne

Vintage: London in the 1950s by Roger Mayne

Roger Mayne (1929 – 2014) was an English photographer, most famous for his documentation of the children of Southam Street, London. With some financial and limited curatorial security established, he began to look for a significant personal project. He found it in the street life of Southam Street in Notting Dale (now often considered part of Notting Hill), which he…
Vintage: Mugshots of Prisoners in West London (1890s)

Vintage: Mugshots of Prisoners in West London (1890s)

These photographs were taken in 1880 and 1890 at Wormwood Scrubs prison in West London by unknown photographer. These portraits are unusual compared with the standard of prison photography at the time, in that they combine the profile and frontal portrait in one photograph. The prisoners hold up their hands to show any identifying features, such as tattoos or missing…
Vinatge: London Skinheads by Derek Ridgers (1980s)

Vinatge: London Skinheads by Derek Ridgers (1980s)

In the late 1970s, the skinhead subculture was revived to a notable extent after the introduction of punk rock. Most of these revivalist skinheads reacted to the commercialism of punk by adopting a look that was in line with the original 1969 skinhead style. This revival included Gary Hodges and Hoxton Tom McCourt (both later of the band the 4-Skins)…
Vintage: Christmas on London’s Streets (1908-1967)

Vintage: Christmas on London’s Streets (1908-1967)

Commercial Christmas industry was borne by Victorians in 1848 when a British confectioner, Tom Smith, invented a bold new way to sell sweets. Inspired by a trip to Paris where he saw bon bons – sugared almonds wrapped in twists of paper – he came up with the idea of the Christmas cracker: a simple package filled with sweets that…
Vintage: Padaung women in London (1935)

Vintage: Padaung women in London (1935)

The Kayan Lahwi people, also known as Padaung, are a minority ethnic group with populations in Burma and Thailand. Padaung women are famous for their distinctive custom of wearing brass coils around their necks. Women of the Kayan tribes identify themselves by their forms of dress. Women of the Kayan Lahwi tribe are well known for wearing neck rings, brass…
Vintage: London in the 1860s and 1870s by James Hedderly

Vintage: London in the 1860s and 1870s by James Hedderly

James Hedderly (1815 – 1885) was a painter and signwriter until the mid-1860s, when he became a photographer. He lived in Duke Street, only a short distance from Whistler’s house at 7 Lindsey Row, from 1841 until the 1870s, when the street was demolished for the Embankment. He then moved to 21 Riley Street, where The Chelsea, Pimlico and Belgravia…
Vintage: London in the 1930s by Wolfgang Suschitzky

Vintage: London in the 1930s by Wolfgang Suschitzky

Wolfgang Suschitzky (born 1912) decided there was no future for him in Austria and in 1934 left for London, where his sister lived. Suschitzky focusesing in particularly on Charing Cross Road and its famous bookshops. His own family were booksellers and publishers, and East End street life., Hhe has created fascinating social documentaries of the period recording the people as…
London in the Blackout (1939)

London in the Blackout (1939)

Even before World War II began, the British Air Ministry had predicted that the United Kingdom would be bombed at night by German air forces. One of the very few precautions the nation could take was the elimination of man-made light. In July 1939 – two months before the declaration of war – the British government distributed Public Information Leaflet…
Vintage: London Fog in black and white

Vintage: London Fog in black and white

The cold weather preceding and during the smog meant that Londoners were burning more coal than usual to keep warm. Post-war domestic coal tended to be of a relatively low-grade, sulfurous variety (economic necessity meant that better-quality “hard” coals tended to be exported), which increased the amount of sulfur dioxide in the smoke. There were also numerous coal-fired power stations…
Vintage: General Strike in London, United Kingdom (1926)

Vintage: General Strike in London, United Kingdom (1926)

The 1926 general strike in the United Kingdom was a general strike that lasted 9 days, from 4 May 1926 to 13 May 1926. It was called by the general council of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in an unsuccessful attempt to force the British government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for 800,000 locked-out coal miners.…
Henri Cartier-Bresson: A Decisive Collection

Henri Cartier-Bresson: A Decisive Collection

Born in 1908, Henri Cartier-Bresson was one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century. Best known for using a lightweight Leica camera to develop the concept of the “decisive moment”, Cartier-Bresson transformed photojournalism into an artform that balanced powerful subject matter with perfectly timed, elegant composition. Exhibition is centred around a private collection of prints, curated according to…
London transport in the 1940s

London transport in the 1940s

In all the history of transport in London, there are periods that could be considered with the benefit of hindsight to be pivotal. Years such as 1933, with the creation of the London Passenger Transport Board; 1952, with the running of the final trams and 1962, with the last trolleybus conversion, were undoubtedly significant years, but it is hard to…