Vintage: Sydney during the 1900 Bubonic Plague

Vintage: Sydney during the 1900 Bubonic Plague


When bubonic plague struck Sydney in 1900, George McCredie was appointed by the Government to take charge of all quarantine activities in the Sydney area, beginning work on March 23, 1900. At the time of his appointment, McCredie was an architect and consulting engineer with offices in the Mutual Life of New York Building in Martin Place. McCredie’s appointment was much criticised in Parliament, though it was agreed later that his work was successful.

The infected areas, and buildings selected for demolition because of the health risks they supposedly raised, were recorded by photography. Most of the buildings demolished were considered slum buildings.

Batson's Lane, off Sussex-street

Batson’s Lane, off Sussex-street

Cleaning the streets

Cleaning the streets

Barker-street

Barker-street

Rear of unidentified butcher's yard with adjacent outhouses

Rear of unidentified butcher’s yard with adjacent outhouses

Sutton Forest Butchery. No. 761 George street

Sutton Forest Butchery. No. 761 George street

Kent-street

Kent-street

Exeter Place, off Wexford-street

Exeter Place, off Wexford-street

No. 50 Wexford-street (rear), Chinese bedroom

No. 50 Wexford-street (rear), Chinese bedroom

Nos. 24, etc., Hunt-street

Nos. 24, etc., Hunt-street

No. 841 George-street (kitchen)

No. 841 George-street (kitchen)

Professional Ratcatchers

Professional Ratcatchers

via State Library of New South Wales


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