Vintage: Ottoman Clothing (19th Century)

Vintage: Ottoman Clothing (19th Century)


Ottoman clothing is the style and design of clothing worn by the Ottoman Turks.

While the Palace and its court dressed lavishly, the common people were only concerned with covering themselves. Starting in the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent, administrators enacted sumptuary laws upon clothing. The clothing of Muslims, Christians, Jewish communities, clergy, tradesmen, and state and military officials were particularly strictly regulated during the reign of Suleiman the Magnificent.

Women’s everyday wear was şalvar (trousers), a gömlek (chemise) that came down to the mid-calf or ankle, a short, fitted jacket called a zıbın, and a sash or belt tied at or just below the waist. For formal occasions, such as visiting friends, the woman added an entari or kaftan, a long robe that was cut like the zıbın apart from the length. Both zıbın and kaftan were buttoned to the waist, leaving the skirts open in front. Both garments also had buttons all the way to the throat, but were often buttoned only to the underside of the bust, leaving the garments to gape open over the bust. All of these clothes could be brightly colored and patterned. However, when a woman left the house, she covered her clothes with a ferace, a dark, modestly cut robe that buttoned all the way to the throat. She also covered her hair and face with a pair of veils.

1. Caikdji (cabman) 2. Sakka (water carrier) 3. Hammal (porter)

1. Caikdji (cabman) 2. Sakka (water carrier) 3. Hammal (porter)

1. Mevlevi Dervish 2. Bektashi Dervish 3. Mullah

1. Mevlevi Dervish 2. Bektashi Dervish 3. Mullah

1. Turkish lady from Istanbul 2. Turkish schoolboy

1. Turkish lady from Istanbul 2. Turkish schoolboy

1. Armenian bride 2. Jewish woman from Istanbul 3. Greek girl

1. Armenian bride 2. Jewish woman from Istanbul 3. Greek girl

1. Muslim inhabitant of Edirne 2. Muslim horseman from Edirne 3. Christian artisan from Edirne

1. Muslim inhabitant of Edirne 2. Muslim horseman from Edirne 3. Christian artisan from Edirne

1. Greek peasant from Bitola 2. Greek peasant woman Bitola 3. Bulgarian woman from Shkodër

1. Greek peasant from Bitola 2. Greek peasant woman Bitola 3. Bulgarian woman from Shkodër

1. Muslim horseman from Plovdiv 2. Bulgarian woman from Koyountepe 3. Bulgarian woman from Ah'i Tchelebi

1. Muslim horseman from Plovdiv 2. Bulgarian woman from Koyountepe 3. Bulgarian woman from Ah’i Tchelebi

1. Bulgarian woman from Ahi Tchelebi 2. Greek woman from Haskovo 3. Peasant woman from Baidjas

1. Bulgarian woman from Ahi Tchelebi 2. Greek woman from Haskovo 3. Peasant woman from Baidjas

1: Bulgarian from Sofia 2. Bulgarian woman from Sofia

1: Bulgarian from Sofia 2. Bulgarian woman from Sofia

1: Bulgarian woman from Ruse 2. Christian Bulgarian from Vidin 3. Muslim Bulgarian from Vidin

1: Bulgarian woman from Ruse 2. Christian Bulgarian from Vidin 3. Muslim Bulgarian from Vidin

1: Muslim woman from Prizren 2. Farmers from around Prizren 3. Christian peasant woman from Matefse

1: Muslim woman from Prizren 2. Farmers from around Prizren 3. Christian peasant woman from Matefse

1: Hodja from Shkodër 2. Christian priest from Shkodër

1: Hodja from Shkodër 2. Christian priest from Shkodër

1: Muslim lady from Shkodër 2. Christian lady from Shkodër 3. Peasant woman from Malissor

1: Muslim lady from Shkodër 2. Christian lady from Shkodër 3. Peasant woman from Malissor

1: Wealthy Arnaut from Ioannina 2. Wealthy Arnaut lady from Ioannina 3. Arnaut child of a wealthy family.

1: Wealthy Arnaut from Ioannina 2. Wealthy Arnaut lady from Ioannina 3. Arnaut child of a wealthy family.


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