Grand Central Terminal in New York City

Grand Central Terminal in New York City


Built by and named for the New York Central Railroad in the heyday of American long-distance passenger rail travel, it is the largest such facility in the world by number of platforms with 44 serving 67 tracks along them. They are on two levels, both below ground, with 41 tracks on the upper level and 26 on the lower, though the total number of tracks along platforms and in rail yards exceeds 100.

Although the terminal has been properly called “Grand Central Terminal” since 1913, it has “always been more colloquially and affectionately known as Grand Central Station”, the name of the previous rail station on the same site, and of the U.S. Post Office station next door, which is not part of the terminal. It is also sometimes used to refer to the Grand Central – 42nd Street subway station, which serves the terminal.

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-01

Sunlight streams through the windows in the concourse at Grand Central Terminal in New York City in 1954. # AP Photo

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-02

Excavation work at the site of Grand Central Station in New York City, in 1908. Click here to see an extra-large (8,000px wide) version of this image. # Reuters/Courtesy of Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-03

Excavations for the construction of Grand Central Station in New York City, in 1908. # Reuters/Courtesy of Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-04

Incline from subway to suburban concourse, Grand Central Terminal, New York, ca 1912. # Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-05

Restaurant, Grand Central Terminal, ca 1912. # Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-06

Men stand on an incline to suburban concourse, Grand Central Terminal, ca 1912. # Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-07

A workman lies atop the eleven-foot arm of Mercury, part of the statuary at Grand Central Station. # © Bettmann/CORBIS

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-08

Suburban concourse with ramp, Grand Central Terminal, ca 1912. # Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-09

Grand Central Terminal, at Vanderbilt Ave and 42nd St., ca 1919. # Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-10

A crowd looks on as the “Bremen”, a German Junkers W33 aircraft, and the first plane to fly west across the Atlantic, is placed on display in Grand Central Terminal, on May 21, 1929. # © Bettmann/CORBIS

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-11

Grand Central Terminal at E. 42nd St. and Vanderbilt Ave. in New York City. # AP Photo

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-12

A massive photomural to promote the sale of defense bonds, designed by the Farm Security Administration, in the concourse of Grand Central Terminal, in 1941. # Library of Congress

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-13

The interior of Grand Central Station, with the sun streaming in through the window. # © Bettmann/CORBIS

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-14

A man and woman talk together as people pass through the Main Concourse of New York’s Grand Central Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, in October of 1941. # AP Photo/Farm Security Administration, John Vachon

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-15

Would-be passengers sit on their luggage in Grand Central Terminal on May 23, 1946, where they were stranded by a rail strike. # © Bettmann/CORBIS

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-16

Some 5,000 workers watch the launching of astronaut John H, Glenn Jr. into orbit around the world on a huge television screen in Grand Central Terminal, on February 20, 1962. # © Bettmann/CORBIS

Grand-Central-Terminal-in-New-York-City-17

The 20th Century Limited gets ready to leave Grand Central Station in New York for its last run, on December 2, 1967. The 20th Century Limited was an express passenger train that ran between between Grand Central Terminal and LaSalle Street Station in Chicago, operated by the New York Central Railroad from 1902 until 1967. # AP Photo/John Duricka

via The Atlantic


Comments

comments