Vintage Behind the Scenes: Goldfinger (1964)

Vintage Behind the Scenes: Goldfinger (1964)


With the court case between Kevin McClory and Fleming surrounding Thunderball still in the High Courts, producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman turned to Goldfinger as the third Bond film. Goldfinger had what was then considered a large budget of $3 million (US$23 million in 2018), the equivalent of the budgets of Dr. No and From Russia with Love combined, and was the first James Bond film classified as a box-office blockbuster. Goldfinger was chosen with the American cinema market in mind, as the previous films had concentrated on the Caribbean and Europe.

Margaret Nolan appears in the film as Dink, the woman massaging Bond's back in the Fontainebleu Hotel pool scene.

Margaret Nolan appears in the film as Dink, the woman massaging Bond’s back in the Fontainebleu Hotel pool scene.

Creator Ian Fleming and producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli on set.

Creator Ian Fleming and producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli on set.

Her shots lasted less than five minutes in the finished film and the filming of them was shot quickly, wrapped in a morning's work.

Her shots lasted less than five minutes in the finished film and the filming of them was shot quickly, wrapped in a morning’s work.

Aston Martin were initially reluctant to part with two of their cars for the production. The producers had to pay for the Aston Martin, but after the success of the film, both at the box office and for the company, they never had to spend money on a car again.

Aston Martin were initially reluctant to part with two of their cars for the production. The producers had to pay for the Aston Martin, but after the success of the film, both at the box office and for the company, they never had to spend money on a car again.

Tilly Masterson's Ford Mustang was supposedly the first appearance by a Mustang in a major motion picture. The Mustang was introduced in April of 1964 and "Goldfinger" was released in December. Ford supplied many cars to the film including the CIA agents' Thunderbird, all of Goldfinger's goons cars, and the Lincoln Continental that is crushed.

Tilly Masterson’s Ford Mustang was supposedly the first appearance by a Mustang in a major motion picture. The Mustang was introduced in April of 1964 and “Goldfinger” was released in December. Ford supplied many cars to the film including the CIA agents’ Thunderbird, all of Goldfinger’s goons cars, and the Lincoln Continental that is crushed.

Oddjob never speaks in the film. His only dialogue is "Aha!". The source novel explains he is unable to speak due to having a cleft palate.

Oddjob never speaks in the film. His only dialogue is “Aha!”. The source novel explains he is unable to speak due to having a cleft palate.

Sales of the Aston Martin DB5 increased by fifty per cent after the release of the movie.

Sales of the Aston Martin DB5 increased by fifty per cent after the release of the movie.

Equipment and gadgetry was developed for the Aston Martin car which was not used in the finished movie. This included: Front and back over-riders for jamming other vehicles; a weapon's tray under the driver's seat; a headlights chamber containing triple-spiked nail clusters for firing at enemies, a radio telephone inside the driver's door paneling, and a thermos with a built-in hand grenade. The idea of the Aston Martin's revolving number plates came from director Guy Hamilton who had just been frustrated at receiving a parking ticket. The various revolving license plate numbers for James Bond's Aston Martin DB5 were 4711-EA-62 (France), LU 6789 (Switzerland) and BMT 216A (UK).

Equipment and gadgetry was developed for the Aston Martin car which was not used in the finished movie. This included: Front and back over-riders for jamming other vehicles; a weapon’s tray under the driver’s seat; a headlights chamber containing triple-spiked nail clusters for firing at enemies, a radio telephone inside the driver’s door paneling, and a thermos with a built-in hand grenade. The idea of the Aston Martin’s revolving number plates came from director Guy Hamilton who had just been frustrated at receiving a parking ticket. The various revolving license plate numbers for James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 were 4711-EA-62 (France), LU 6789 (Switzerland) and BMT 216A (UK).

In the film's trailer, Fröbe's own heavily accented voice is heard when Goldfainger tells James, "Choose your next witticism carefully, Mr. Bond, it may be your last". Fröbe dubbed his own voice in the German dubbed version of the film, too.

In the film’s trailer, Fröbe’s own heavily accented voice is heard when Goldfainger tells James, “Choose your next witticism carefully, Mr. Bond, it may be your last”. Fröbe dubbed his own voice in the German dubbed version of the film, too.

When Pussy Galore introduces herself to Bond, he replies "I must be dreaming." The original script had Bond replying "I know you are, but what's your name?" This was deemed too suggestive.

When Pussy Galore introduces herself to Bond, he replies “I must be dreaming.” The original script had Bond replying “I know you are, but what’s your name?” This was deemed too suggestive.

Honor Blackman quit her role as Cathy Gale on "The Avengers" (1961) to appear in "Goldfinger". A 1965 episode made sly reference to this by having John Steed receive a Christmas card from Cathy Gale - sent from Fort Knox.

Honor Blackman quit her role as Cathy Gale on “The Avengers” (1961) to appear in “Goldfinger”. A 1965 episode made sly reference to this by having John Steed receive a Christmas card from Cathy Gale – sent from Fort Knox.


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