Steidl

Frank Gohlke: Speeding Trucks and other Follies

Frank Gohlke: Speeding Trucks and other Follies

In the summer of 1971 Frank Gohlke moved with his wife and young daughter from Middlebury, Vermont to Minneapolis, Minnesota. His vocation as a photographer had begun four years prior, but he had yet to define the subject that would occupy him for the next 45 years: the landscapes of ordinary life. The three bodies of work brought together in…
Arthur Elgort: Ballet

Arthur Elgort: Ballet

Following his career-spanning monograph The Big Picture, Arthur Elgort pays homage to his first love and eternal muse in this new collection of photographs. Through Elgort’s lens we encounter ballet not onstage but behind the scenes where the hard work is done. On this journey through the hallways and rehearsal spaces of some of the world’s most distinguished ballet schools,…
Robert Frank: The Lines of My Hand

Robert Frank: The Lines of My Hand

The book was originally published by Yugensha in Tokyo in 1972, and this new Steidl edition, made in close collaboration with Frank, follows and updates the first US edition by Lustrum Press of 1972. The Lines of My Hand is structured chronologically and presents selections from every stage of Frank’s work until 1972―from early photos in Switzerland in 1945–46, to…
William Eggleston: Black and White

William Eggleston: Black and White

Black and White is an updated and expanded edition of William Eggleston’s (born 1939) Before Color (Steidl, 2012), the first publication to comprehensively present Eggleston’s early black-and-white photos and explore his artistic beginnings. In the late 1950s Eggleston began photographing his hometown of Memphis, discovering many of the motifs that would come to define his seminal work in color: the…
David Goldblatt: Fietas Fractured

David Goldblatt: Fietas Fractured

This book presents photos by David Goldblatt taken between 1952 and 2016 of Fietas in Johannesburg, with an emphasis on his 1976–77 images of the suburb’s last Indian residents before they were forcibly removed under apartheid. Known affectionately by its inhabitants as Fietas, though officially called Pageview, this was one of the city’s few “non-racial” suburbs, where Malay, African, Chinese,…
Lee Friedlander: Chain Link

Lee Friedlander: Chain Link

Lee Friedlander is celebrated for his ability to weave disparate elements from ordinary life into uncanny images of great formal complexity and visual wit. And few things have attracted his attention―or been more unpredictable in their effect―than the humble chain link fence. Erected to delineate space, form protective barriers and bring order to chaos, the fences in Friedlander’s pictures catch…
Anders Petersen: Zoo

Anders Petersen: Zoo

Zoo is a wild ride through Anders Petersen’s oeuvre, a racy edit of his work that has animals as its central theme. Whether they be conscious portraits of animals or a haphazard photographic encounter with a woman’s legs in python-print tights, Petersen draws out the animal and animalistic in all that he sees. At a typical zoo we are the…
Liu Zheng: Dream Shock

Liu Zheng: Dream Shock

The “dream shock” of Liu Zheng’s title refers to an awakening as if from a deep sleep. There is a moment between sleep and consciousness in which the dream state and conscious reality collide. It is a fertile, erotic and sometimes violent area of the mind, in which both exquisite and tortured imagery may surface. Liu Zheng is one of…
Liu Zheng: The Chinese

Liu Zheng: The Chinese

In 1994, Chinese artist Liu Zheng conceived of an ambitious photographic project called The Chinese, which occupied him for seven years and carried him throughout China. Inspired by the examples of August Sander and Diane Arbus, he has captured a people and country in a unique time of great flux, providing a startling vision of the deep-rooted historical forces and…
Jake Verzosa: The Last Tattooed Women of Kallinga

Jake Verzosa: The Last Tattooed Women of Kallinga

The Last Tattooed Women of Kalinga presents a series of portraits by Jake Verzosa who laments and celebrates a dying tradition of tattooing in villages throughout the Cordillera mountains in the northern Philippines. For nearly a thousand years the Kalinga women have proudly worn these lace-like patterns or batok on their skin as symbols of beauty, wealth, stature and fortitude.…
Trent Parke: Minutes to Midnight

Trent Parke: Minutes to Midnight

In 2003, Trent Parke began a roadtrip around his native Australia, a monumental journey that was to last two years and cover a distance of over 90,000 km. Minutes to Midnight is the ambitious photographic record of that adventure, in which Parke presents a proud but uneasy nation struggling to craft its identity from different cultures and traditions. Minutes to…
Cheap Rents… and de Kooning: The downtown art world New York, 1957-63

Cheap Rents… and de Kooning: The downtown art world New York, 1957-63

Cheap rents … and de Kooning revisits the New York downtown art scene between 1957 and 1963, when the 10th Street galleries were the center of the art world and inexpensive lofts were still available. Living in this dynamic neighborhood, John Cohen photographed a series of its famous and infamous artists’ haunts―among them the legendary Cedar Bar, the Artists’ Club…
Saul Leiter: Early Black and White

Saul Leiter: Early Black and White

The distinctive iconography of Saul Leiter’s early black-andwhite photographs stems from his profound response to the dynamic street life of New York City in the late 1940s and ’50s. While this technique borrowed aspects of the photo-documentary, Leiter’s imagery was more shaped by his highly individual reactions to the people and places he encountered. Like a Magic Realist with a…
Jerry Berndt: Beautiful America

Jerry Berndt: Beautiful America

Jerry Berndt documented the period between 1968 and 1980 in America like no other photographer. Personally involved in the anti-Vietnam War activities of the 1960s, Berndt’s work combines photojournalism with documentary, conceptual and street photography to create a unique view of America’s social constitution during these decisive years. Berndt consistently placed himself near political conflict, systematically portraying the spectrum of…
Betsy Karel: Times Square

Betsy Karel: Times Square

In America’s Stage: Times Square, street photographer Betsy Karel uses five New York City blocks as a metaphor for urban America today. Her premise is that many of the major trends of our society are present in Times Square: globalism, consumerism, ubiquitous sexualization, hucksterism, surveillance, narcissism. All are compressed and amplified here. In Karel’s photos fantasy parades as reality, corporate…
Robert Frank: Hold Still, Keep Going

Robert Frank: Hold Still, Keep Going

Hold Still, Keep Going is the long-awaited reprint of the catalogue to Robert Frank’s (born 1924) 2001 exhibition at the Museum Folkwang in Essen. Though the artist is best known for his seminal photobook The Americans (1959) and his experimental film Pull My Daisy (1959), until this publication, little scholarship existed on the intersection between Frank’s work in the disciplines…
Hiroh Kikai: Asakusa Portraits

Hiroh Kikai: Asakusa Portraits

The Asakusa quarter of Tokyo has a shady past–it was the home of some of Japan’s most notorious pleasure palaces. Today it embraces this history by remaining a steadfast holdout of independent culture, which encompasses traditional comedy theater and some of the most innovative burlesque in the world. Asakusa has long attracted bohemians who opt out of Japan’s contemporary consumer…
Berenice Abbott: Paris Portraits 1925–1930

Berenice Abbott: Paris Portraits 1925–1930

Abbott began her photographic career in Paris in 1925, taking portraits of some the most celebrated artists and writers of the day, including Marie Laurencin, Jean Cocteau, Peggy Guggenheim, Coco Chanel, Max Ernst, André Gide, Philippe Soupault and James Joyce. Within a year her work was exhibited and acclaimed. Paris Portraits 1925–1930 features the results of Abbott’s earliest photographic project…
Arnold Odermatt: Karambolage

Arnold Odermatt: Karambolage

With thoroughness and a meticulous attention to detail, Arnold Odermatt photographed automobile accidents on the streets of the Swiss canton of Nidwalden between 1939 and 1993. For 40 years, the Swiss police office recorded the wrecked cars left in the wake of excessive speed, drunk driving, right-of-way errors, and plain foolishness, in poignant, sometimes funny, and always strange atmospheric photographs.…
Mitch Epstein: New York Arbor

Mitch Epstein: New York Arbor

Mitch Epstein’s new work is a series of photographs of the idiosyncratic trees that inhabit New York City. These pictures underscore the importance of trees to urban life and their complex relationship to their human counterparts. Rooted in New York’s sidewalks, parks, and cemeteries, some trees grow wild, some are contortionists adapting to constrictive surroundings, while others are pruned into…