New York City

Vintage: Everyday Life of Andy Warhol in New York City (1981)

Vintage: Everyday Life of Andy Warhol in New York City (1981)

In the spring of 1981, as Warhol prepared for “Myths,” his exhibition that fall at New York’s Ronald Feldman Gallery, he spent two days with Robert Levin, a fine art photographer on assignment for Germany’s Stern magazine. Levin followed Warhol everywhere, from the artist’s work at the Factory, to various adventures across the city, including a bike ride in the…
Vintage: New York City Manhattan Skyscrapers (early 20th Century)

Vintage: New York City Manhattan Skyscrapers (early 20th Century)

New York has architecturally significant buildings in a wide range of styles spanning distinct historical and cultural periods. These include the Woolworth Building (1913), an early Gothic revival skyscraper with large-scale gothic architectural detail. The 1916 Zoning Resolution required setback in new buildings, and restricted towers to a percentage of the lot size, to allow sunlight to reach the streets…
Vintage: New York City in the 1930s

Vintage: New York City in the 1930s

The Great Depression, which was to affect the rest of the world, began with the Stock Market Crash of 1929. The recently completed Empire State Building would be known as the “Empty State Building” for many years because it could not attract sufficient tenants in the bleak business climate. When New York Governor Franklin Roosevelt becam president, the Hooverville shacks…
Vintage: Ellis Island immigrants (1900-1910s)

Vintage: Ellis Island immigrants (1900-1910s)

Between 1905 and 1914, an average of one million immigrants per year arrived in the United States. Immigration officials reviewed about 5,000 immigrants per day during peak times at Ellis Island. Two-thirds of those individuals emigrated from eastern, southern and central Europe. The peak year for immigration at Ellis Island was 1907, with 1,004,756 immigrants processed. The all-time daily high…
Helena Rubinstein’s Glamor Factory in New York City (1930s)

Helena Rubinstein’s Glamor Factory in New York City (1930s)

Helena Rubinstein (1872 – 1965) was a Polish American business magnate. A cosmetics entrepreneur, she was the founder and eponym of Helena Rubinstein Incorporated cosmetics company, which made her one of the world’s richest women. Rubinstein’s “Day of Beauty” program is shown in these pictures, which followed clients “shoot the works” in her 715 Fifth Avenue salon. The salon also…