Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus: In the Park

Diane Arbus: In the Park

“… I remember one summer I worked a lot in Washington Square Park. It must have been about 1966. The park was divided. It has these walks, sort of like a sunburst, and there were these territories staked out. There were young hippie junkies down one row. There were lesbians down another, really tough amazingly hard-core lesbians. And in the…
Diane Arbus: In the beginning

Diane Arbus: In the beginning

Diane Arbus: In the beginning considers the first seven years of the photographer’s career, from 1956 to 1962. A lifelong New Yorker, Arbus found the city and its citizens an endlessly rich subject for her art. Working in Times Square, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island, she made some of the most powerful portraits of the twentieth century, training…
Shoot! Shoot! Shoot!

Shoot! Shoot! Shoot!

“Shoot! Shoot! Shoot!” is a collection of spectacular snapshots of a turbulent and legendary age in the history of art, music, fashion and film – the 1960s and ’70s. These decades were known for upheaval, provocation and creative energy. The Nicola Erni Collection, based in Zug, Switzerland, of which some 200 photographs are displayed here, takes visitors right into the…
Diane Arbus: In The Beginning

Diane Arbus: In The Beginning

As part of the inaugural season at The Met Breuer, diane arbus: in the beginning will open on July 12, featuring more than 100 photographs that together will redefine one of the most influential and provocative artists of the 20th century. This landmark exhibition highlights never- before-seen early work of Diane Arbus (1923–71), focusing on the first seven years of…
Biography: Portrait photographer Diane Arbus

Biography: Portrait photographer Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971) was an American photographer and writer noted for black-and-white square photographs of “deviant and marginal people (dwarfs, giants, transgender people, nudists, circus performers) or of people whose normality seems ugly or surreal”. Arbus believed that a camera could be “a little bit cold, a little bit harsh” but its scrutiny revealed…