1910s

Vintage: Everyday Life and Street Scenes of Nuremberg (1910s)

Vintage: Everyday Life and Street Scenes of Nuremberg (1910s)

Nuremberg held great significance during the Nazi Germany era. Because of the city’s relevance to the Holy Roman Empire and its position in the centre of Germany, the Nazi Party chose the city to be the site of huge Nazi Party conventions — the Nuremberg rallies. The rallies were held 1927, 1929 and annually 1933–1938 in Nuremberg. After Adolf Hitler’s…
Vintage: American Child Laborers by Lewis Hine (1900s-1910s)

Vintage: American Child Laborers by Lewis Hine (1900s-1910s)

In 1908 Lewis Hine became the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC), leaving his teaching position. Over the next decade, Hine documented child labor, with focus on the use of child labor in the Carolina Piedmont, to aid the NCLC’s lobbying efforts to end the practice. In 1913, he documented child laborers among cotton mill workers with a…
Vintage: Daily Life of Vienna, Austria by Emil Mayer (1900s-1910s)

Vintage: Daily Life of Vienna, Austria by Emil Mayer (1900s-1910s)

From 1891 to 1896 Emil Mayer studied law at the University of Vienna. In 1896, he earned the juris doctorate. In 1894, while still a student, he converted from the Jewish community to Catholicism. After his studies he settled in Vienna, where he worked as a lawyer. His first experience in photography was as an amateur. He was a member…
Vintage: Havana (early 20th Century)

Vintage: Havana (early 20th Century)

As trade between Caribbean and North American states increased in the early 19th century, Havana became a flourishing and fashionable city. Havana’s theaters featured the most distinguished actors of the age, and prosperity among the burgeoning middle-class led to expensive new classical mansions being erected. During this period Havana became known as the Paris of the Antilles. The 20th century…
Vintage: Soldiers during World War I (1914-1918)

Vintage: Soldiers during World War I (1914-1918)

Life for soldiers in World War I followed a specific routine that involved waking up at around 5 a.m., performing military drills when not engaged in direct combat, eating breakfast, having an early dinner, sleeping briefly, performing more military exercises and then doing physical labor before retiring for the evening. Soldiers in World War I spent most of the time…
Vintage: Ellis Island immigrants (1900-1910s)

Vintage: Ellis Island immigrants (1900-1910s)

Between 1905 and 1914, an average of one million immigrants per year arrived in the United States. Immigration officials reviewed about 5,000 immigrants per day during peak times at Ellis Island. Two-thirds of those individuals emigrated from eastern, southern and central Europe. The peak year for immigration at Ellis Island was 1907, with 1,004,756 immigrants processed. The all-time daily high…
Vintage: Studio Portraits of Girls with Cat by Arnold Genthe (1910s)

Vintage: Studio Portraits of Girls with Cat by Arnold Genthe (1910s)

Arnold Genthe (1869 – 1942) was a German-born American photographer. Genthe had earned a doctorate in Philology before deciding to pursue photography in the early 20th century. Beginning in 1906, Genthe photographed a number of socialites and young girls with a cat he named Buzzer. Using four different cats all named Buzzer, the series of photographs spans over ten years.…
Vintage: Women at work during World War I

Vintage: Women at work during World War I

With men recruited for the armed forces, the industrial workforce changed. Women took on previously male-dominated roles in industry during the war, working alongside men in reserved occupations. Women made an increasingly varied contribution, working in labs, mills and factories, sometimes in hazardous circumstances.
Vintage: Circus Performers in Strabane (1910-1911)

Vintage: Circus Performers in Strabane (1910-1911)

The three main circus shows photographed by Herbert Cooper were Duffy’s Circus, Buff Bill’s American Circus and Hanneford’s Canadian Circus. A few circuses toured Ireland in the years before 1914 and it was the heyday for these travelling shows. Big Tops were then lit by flares and it wasn’t until well into the 1920s that electric lighting became common, so most…
Vintage: Photos of West African Villages and its People (1910-1913)

Vintage: Photos of West African Villages and its People (1910-1913)

Photos in this set were taken by H. Hunting of the Paterson Zochonis trading company between approximately 1910 and 1913.  The company began as a trading post in 1879, and began shipping African products to the United Kindom and importing English goods.  The company grew and expanded to Nigeria in 1899, and these photographs are of company employees and their…
Vintage: New York’s Bohemian Greenwich Village (1910s – 1920s)

Vintage: New York’s Bohemian Greenwich Village (1910s – 1920s)

Jessie Tarbox Beals (1870 – 1942) was an American photographer, the first published female photojournalist in the United States mostly known for her portraits of places such as Bohemian Greenwich Village. Greenwich Village became widely identified as America’s bohemia by the mid-1910s. The radicals who lived in Greenwich Village in the early 20th century rejected traditional structured socialization, preferring instead…
Vintage photos of Warsaw before World War 1914

Vintage photos of Warsaw before World War 1914

Warsaw has had a particularly tumultuous history for a European city. It experienced numerous plagues, invasions, and devastating fires. The most destructive events include the Deluge, the Great Northern War (1702, 1704, 1705), War of the Polish Succession, Warsaw Uprising (1794), Battle of Praga and the Massacre of Praga inhabitants, November Uprising, January Uprising, World War I, Siege of Warsaw…
Vintage Photos of Moscow in 1910s

Vintage Photos of Moscow in 1910s

After losing the status as capital of the empire, the population of Moscow at first decreased, from 200,000 in the 17th century to 130,000 in 1750. But after 1750, the population grew more than tenfold over the remaining duration of the Russian Empire, reaching 1.8 million by 1915.
Movie Theatre Etiquette Posters from 1912

Movie Theatre Etiquette Posters from 1912

The Library of Congress has a fascinating series of vintage movie theatre “etiquette” posters from 1912. At the time, films were silent as movies with sound didn’t become prevalent until the late 1920s. Sadly, a September 2013 report by the United States Library of Congress announced that a total of 70% of American silent films are believed to be completely…
Vintage: The Eastland disaster (1915)

Vintage: The Eastland disaster (1915)

A large crowd of horrified spectators watched as the S.S. Eastland – only a few feet from the shore of the Chicago River downtown — turned on its side. It was in just 20 feet of water, but that was deep enough to drown 844 people who were trapped or trampled below decks. via Chicago Tribune