Nicholas Nixon shoots four sisters every year for 40 years

Nicholas Nixon shoots four sisters every year for 40 years


© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

In August 1974, Nick Nixon made a photograph of his wife, Bebe, and her three sisters. He wasn’t pleased with the result and discarded the negative. In July 1975 he made one that seemed promising enough to keep. At the time, the Brown sisters were 15 (Mimi), 21 (Laurie), 23 (Heather), and 25 (Bebe). The following June, Laurie Brown graduated from college, and Nick made another picture of the four sisters. It was after this second successful picture that the group agreed to gather annually for a portrait, and settled on the series’ two constants: the sisters would always appear in the same order—from left to right, Heather, Mimi, Bebe, and Laurie—and they would jointly agree on a single image to represent a given year. Also significant, and unchanging, is the fact that each portrait is made with an 8 x 10″ view camera on a tripod and is captured on a black-and-white film negative.

In his first published statement about photography, written the year he made the first of the Brown Sisters portraits, Nixon remarked, “The world is infinitely more interesting than any of my opinions about it.” If he was modest about his opinions, though, his photographs clearly show how the camera can capture that infinitely interesting world. And to the attentive viewer, these silent records, with their countless shades of visual and emotional gray, can promote a new appreciation of an intangible part of it: the world of time and age, of commitment and love.

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

© 2014 Nicholas Nixon

via MoMA


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