Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)


This collection of photographs were taken during Mark Gayn’s trip to China in 1965, and include images of factories, farms, protests, and political happenings.

Mark Gayn was a Canadian journalist born near the Manchurian-Mongolian border on April 21, 1909. Over the 5 decade span of his career, he contributed articles to such publications as the Toronto Daily Star, the New York Times Magazine, the Washington Post, Le Monde, Yomiuri, and the Chicago Daily News.

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Agriculture in China is still decades from mechanization. These are scenes from one of the most famous communes in China, in the province of Shansi. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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Agriculture in China is still decades from mechanization. These are scenes from one of the most famous communes in China, in the province of Shansi. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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An anti-American demonstration in Peking. Part of the banner top centre suggests these are workers from a paper-making plant. The cartoon in the right hand top corner says “Johnson Has Lost His Mind Again”. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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Every city has its displays of propaganda cartoons and photographs. This is a typical one. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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A cable factory in Shanghai. The poster in the background urges the workers to follow the “Three Red Banners” — “Long Live the General Line of the Party” –“Long Live the Great Leap Forward” — “Long Live the People’s Communes” – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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Children in a kindergarten playing “bus” – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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A street scene in Yeman, for ten years (1937-47) capital of Red China – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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One of main streets in Loyang, an ancient city that has now become an industrial centre. The largest tractor works in China are situated here. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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Anti-American propaganda posters on display in a street in west China. These are now an integral part of the Chinese landscape. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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An old man in charge of a portable library of comics for the kids. Almost without exception these comics are humorless and political. They preach a hatred for the United States and Japanese imperialism, seek to inculcate love for Mao Tse-tung and provide – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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A street scene in Yenan, in 1937-47 capital of Red China. The caves in the background were used by Mao and his fellow leaders as well as by universities, hospitals, editorial offices and army headquarters. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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A sidewalk tea shop in Sian in western China. There is no private enterprise in China and even this establishment is owned by a cooperative. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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The offices of the People’s Daily, the official organ of the Communist Party. It is “must” reading for every Communist and every official who wants to get ahead. – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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A street display of propaganda films and publications – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)

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An exhibition of built in China industrial machinary in Shanghai, in what was once the Hall of Soviet Chinese Friendship. These are all prototypes, and are never seen in use in factories open to the western visitor. They occasionally crop up, however… – Vintage: B&W photos of Life in China (1965)


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