Vintage

Vintage: Japan Daily Life by Arnold Genthe (1908)

Vintage: Japan Daily Life by Arnold Genthe (1908)

Arnold Genthe was born in Berlin, Prussia, to Louise Zober and Hermann Genthe, a professor of Latin and Greek at the Graues Kloster (Grey Monastery) in Berlin. Genthe followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming a classically trained scholar; he received a doctorate in philology in 1894 from the University of Jena, where he knew artist Adolf Menzel, his mother’s cousin.…
Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Oskar Jarén was born in Kasper Borg Frinnaryd in 1877 and died in his hometown in 1954. In 1960s all of his 2,000 glass plates were rescued from oblivion with the help of Frinnaryds photoclub. This collection documents daily life in Sweden from between the 1910s and 1920s. via JÖNKÖPINGS LÄNS MUSEUM
Vintage: The sinking and raising of U-Boat 110 (1918)

Vintage: The sinking and raising of U-Boat 110 (1918)

This collection is taken from an album of photographs found in the Swan Hunter shipbuilders collection at Tyne & Wear Archives. The album is from 1918 and documents the U.B. 110 before she was scrapped on the dry docks of Swan Hunter Wigham Richardson Ltd, Wallsend. The twin-screw German submarine U.B. 110 was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. On…
Vintage: Elisabeth Bridge in Budapest

Vintage: Elisabeth Bridge in Budapest

The original permanent crossing, a decorative suspension bridge of chains, was built between 1897 and 1903, amid a corruption scandal. The Buda end of Erzsébet bridge runs directly into the massive foot of Gellért Hill, necessitating a complicated arrangement of roads to connect to the bridge. The bridge was designed in such a way because a wealthy nobleman, a member…
Vintage: Aerial Boston (1920s)

Vintage: Aerial Boston (1920s)

The American Revolution erupted in Boston, as the British retaliated harshly for the Boston Tea Party and the patriots fought back. They besieged the British in the city, with a famous battle at Bunker Hill in Charlestown on June 17, 1775 (which was lost by the colonists, but inflicted great damage against the British) and won the Siege of Boston,…
Vintage: Boats of Old China (Junks) in the 1900s

Vintage: Boats of Old China (Junks) in the 1900s

A junk is an ancient Chinese sailing ship design that is still in use today. Junks were efficient and sturdy ships that sailed long distances as early as the 2nd century AD, although whether this is indeed a date by which the hull form which we know as the junk’s had found its final form is extremely dubious. Most scholars…
Vintage: Building the Tyne Bridge (1927 to 1929)

Vintage: Building the Tyne Bridge (1927 to 1929)

The Tyne Bridge is one of the North East’s most iconic landmarks. These photographs were taken by James Bacon & Sons of Newcastle and document its construction from March 1927 to October 1928. They belonged to James Geddie, who was Chief Assistant Engineer on the construction of the Bridge with Dorman, Long & Co. Ltd. of Middlesbrough. Photos from the…
Vintage: New York City in the 1930s

Vintage: New York City in the 1930s

The Great Depression, which was to affect the rest of the world, began with the Stock Market Crash of 1929. The recently completed Empire State Building would be known as the “Empty State Building” for many years because it could not attract sufficient tenants in the bleak business climate. When New York Governor Franklin Roosevelt becam president, the Hooverville shacks…
Vinatge: Harlem Street Life in the late 1930s by Hansel Mieth

Vinatge: Harlem Street Life in the late 1930s by Hansel Mieth

By the late 1930s, Harlem was a bustling cultural center, home to two thirds of New York City’s African-American population. The Harlem Renaissance, a robust period of literary and artistic expression, had helped put the neighborhood on the map, and a walk through its streets revealed stately houses of worship like the Abyssinian Baptist Church, a thriving music scene centered…
Vintage: B&W Photos of Scotland from between the 1840s and 1880s

Vintage: B&W Photos of Scotland from between the 1840s and 1880s

In 19th century Glasgow became one of the largest cities in the world, and known as “the Second City of the Empire” after London. After 1860 the Clydeside shipyards specialised in steamships made of iron (after 1870, made of steel), which rapidly replaced the wooden sailing vessels of both the merchant fleets and the battle fleets of the world. It…
Vintage: B&W Fashion Photography by Paul Huf (1960s and 1970s)

Vintage: B&W Fashion Photography by Paul Huf (1960s and 1970s)

Paul Huf (1924-2002), son of actor Paul Huf and Eve Bernardine de Beneditty, has been very important for the Dutch photography. He started in 1946 as a photographer at the ‘Comedia theater company’. He made studio pictures, glamor portraits, advertising campaigns and glossy fashion photos. In the fifties Huf was known by his portraits of Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard.…
Vintage: Amsterdam in Victorian Era by Jacob Olie (1890s)

Vintage: Amsterdam in Victorian Era by Jacob Olie (1890s)

At the end of the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution reached Amsterdam. The Amsterdam-Rijn kanaal was dug to give Amsterdam a direct connection to the Rhine and the Noordzee kanaal to give the port a connection with the North Sea. Both projects improved communication with the rest of Europe and the world dramatically. They gave the economy a big boost.…
Vintage: Sami People and Arctic (1900s)

Vintage: Sami People and Arctic (1900s)

The Sami people are an indigenous Finno-Ugric people inhabiting the Arctic area of Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of far northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. The Sami are the only indigenous people of Scandinavia recognized and protected under the international conventions of indigenous peoples, and are hence the northernmost indigenous people of Europe. Sami ancestral…
Vintage: Everyday Life and Street Scenes of Nuremberg (1910s)

Vintage: Everyday Life and Street Scenes of Nuremberg (1910s)

Nuremberg held great significance during the Nazi Germany era. Because of the city’s relevance to the Holy Roman Empire and its position in the centre of Germany, the Nazi Party chose the city to be the site of huge Nazi Party conventions — the Nuremberg rallies. The rallies were held 1927, 1929 and annually 1933–1938 in Nuremberg. After Adolf Hitler’s…
Vintage: Everyday Life in Jamaica (1890s)

Vintage: Everyday Life in Jamaica (1890s)

The second half of the nineteenth century was a period of severe economic decline for Jamaica. Low crop prices, droughts, and disease led to serious social unrest, culminating in the Morant Bay rebellions of 1865. However, renewed British administration after the 1865 rebellion, in the form of Crown colony status, resulted in some social and economic progress as well as…
Vintage: Helsinki in the late 19th Century (1890s)

Vintage: Helsinki in the late 19th Century (1890s)

During the 19th century, Helsinki became the economic and cultural center of Finland; as elsewhere, technological advancements such as railroads and industrialization were key factors behind the city’s growth. The first Helsinki railway station opened in 1862 with service to Hämeenlinna. Beginning from the late 19th century, the Finnish language became more and more dominant in the city, since the…
Vintage: Los Angeles Retro Restaurants

Vintage: Los Angeles Retro Restaurants

We’re used to seeing swanky rooftop restaurants and bars, taco stands and outdoor patios decorated with lights in Los Angeles. But back in the day we had restaurants and food stands that took architecture to the next level, with wacky buildings shaped as actual items like tamales, hot dogs and planes. via LAist
Vintage: United States in the 1930s by John Gutmann

Vintage: United States in the 1930s by John Gutmann

A painter turned photographer, John Gutmann began working as a photojournalist in 1933 for Presse-Photo. Being Jewish, in 1936 he fled Nazi Germany to the United States where he worked as a photographer for various German magazines, signing on with Pix Publishing, an agency he worked with for over twenty years. Gutmann’s main subject matter was the American way of…