Vintage

Images from “Safety Last!” (1923)

Images from “Safety Last!” (1923)

Safety Last! is a 1923 romantic comedy silent film starring Harold Lloyd. It includes one of the most famous images from the silent film era: Lloyd clutching the hands of a large clock as he dangles from the outside of a skyscraper above moving traffic. The film was highly successful and critically hailed, and it cemented Lloyd’s status as a major…
Grant Park in Chicago

Grant Park in Chicago

The city officially designated the land as a park on April 29, 1844, naming it Lake Park. When the Illinois Central Railroad was built into Chicago in 1852, it was permitted to lay track along the lakefront on a causeway built offshore from the park. The resulting lagoon became stagnant, and was largely filled in 1871 with debris from the…
Coca-Cola Delivery Trucks

Coca-Cola Delivery Trucks

Over the past 100-plus years, trucks have evolved as Coca-Cola delivery trucks attest. From the solid axles to right-hand drive to the bottles exposed to the elements, this truck looks radically different than today’s modern beverage delivery trucks, but still fulfills the same function–to deliver beverages to retail customers. via Coca-Cola Archives
Roy Repp and his Stunt Car

Roy Repp and his Stunt Car

Roy Repp was an Australian stunt driver. One of his stunt cars was Maude the Motor Mule. For this car, he would pull a lever, and a heavy weight beneath the car moves forward or backward to shift the center of gravity and makes the car rear up on its hind wheels or front wheels.   via Library of Congress
Vintage photos of Moscow in the past (19th century)

Vintage photos of Moscow in the past (19th century)

The city of Moscow gradually grew around the Moscow Kremlin, beginning in the 14th century. It was the capital of Great Russia, also known as the Grand Duchy of Moscow (or Muscovy), from 1340 to 1547 and then the Tsardom of Russia until 1712 (when the capital was moved to Saint Petersburg). It was the capital of the Russian Soviet…
Gangsters & Grifters

Gangsters & Grifters

Created from the Chicago Tribune’s vast archives, Gangsters & Grifters is a collection of photographs featuring infamous criminals, small-time bandits, smirking crooks, pickpockets, hoodlums, and wise guys at shocking crime scenes. These vintage glass-plate and acetate negatives were taken in the early 1900s through the 1950s, and have been largely unseen for generations. That is because most have never been…
Chinese Humiliation Parade in New York City in 1938

Chinese Humiliation Parade in New York City in 1938

Twelve thousand Chinese people from all parts of the Metropolitan area closed their laundries and other businesses to take part in the largest demonstration ever staged in the United States. It observed China’s “National Humiliation Day,” the annual holiday on which China’s people pause to recall Japan’s humiliating twenty-one demands of May 9, 1915. Via LIFE archives
Marilyn Monroe doing Yoga in 1948

Marilyn Monroe doing Yoga in 1948

Marilyn Monroe, best known for being a mid-century sex symbol, is rarely thought of as a fitness icon, but during a 1952 interview with LIFE magazine, she revealed that she exercised regularly. Monroe was a devotee of yoga and enjoyed practicing. It was a fact she didn’t publicise much and there are few photographic records of her doing yoga. However,…
Warsaw in the late 19th Century

Warsaw in the late 19th Century

Warsaw flourished in the late 19th century under Mayor Sokrates Starynkiewicz (1875–92), a Russian-born general appointed by Tsar Alexander III. Under Starynkiewicz Warsaw saw its first water and sewer systems designed and built by the English engineer William Lindley and his son, William Heerlein Lindley, as well as the expansion and modernization of horsecars, street lighting and gas works. Starynkiewicz…
The Great Blizzard of 1947 in New York City

The Great Blizzard of 1947 in New York City

In December 1947, a huge, historic storm dumped record levels of snow on the northeastern United States. The Great Blizzard of 1947 was a snowfall that began on Christmas without prediction and brought the northeastern United States to a standstill. The snowstorm was described as the worst blizzard after 1888. The storm was not accompanied by high winds, but the…
Photos of the 1938 Los Angeles Flood

Photos of the 1938 Los Angeles Flood

The Los Angeles flood of 1938 was responsible for inundating much of Los Angeles, Orange, and Riverside counties, California during February and March 1938. The flood was caused by a pair of Pacific storms that swept inland across the Los Angeles Basin, causing abnormally high rainfall across much of coastal Southern California. Rivers overflowed and dozens of people were killed.…
Philip Davies: Panoramas of Lost London

Philip Davies: Panoramas of Lost London

Nearly 300 spectacular photographs of Londons lost buildings from the London Metropolitan Archive in Panoramic format. Tudor, Georgian and Victorian buidings, some of them historic masterpieces, captured in location just before their destruction between 1870-1945. Philip Davies Panoramas of Lost London Transatlantic Press, 2011 ISBN-13: 978-1907176722 368 pages, Hardcover 37x29cm Order the book: www.amazon.co.uk
Street Scenes of Madrid and Barcelona in the 1950’s

Street Scenes of Madrid and Barcelona in the 1950’s

In 1948, Francesc Català-Roca began working independently as a photojournalist for magazines such as “Destino” and “Revista.” His work dealt with a variety of themes, from landscapes to cityscapes, from artistic documentation to ethnography. He is considered as one of the major photographers in Catalonia not only for his role as a pioneer in the field of avant-garde photography but…
Rochester’s Great Flood of 1913

Rochester’s Great Flood of 1913

The winter had been unusually warm and rainy, and the ground already soaked to the max, when a powerful arctic weather system – stretching from Ontario down to the Gulf of Mexico – swept through. Beginning on Easter Sunday, March 23, the rains pounded all of upstate New York. Hurricane force winds and heavy sleet took down power and communication…
Disneyland in Opening Day, July 17, 1955

Disneyland in Opening Day, July 17, 1955

Disneyland was dedicated at an “International Press Preview” event held on Sunday, July 17, 1955, which was only open to invited guests and the media. Although 28,000 people attended the event, only about half of those were actual invitees, the rest having purchased counterfeit tickets. The following day, it opened to the public, featuring twenty attractions. The Special Sunday events,…
Street Scenes in New York City in the 1970s

Street Scenes in New York City in the 1970s

Forget the disco era, the 1970s in New York City was all about danger. With pimps and prostitutes populating the streets, an economic collapse and a crime-filled subway system, the streets of Manhattan were gritty and dark. Check out photographer Leland Bobbe’s shots of New York during a period when it hit an all-time low. Via NY Daily News
London transport in the 1940s

London transport in the 1940s

In all the history of transport in London, there are periods that could be considered with the benefit of hindsight to be pivotal. Years such as 1933, with the creation of the London Passenger Transport Board; 1952, with the running of the final trams and 1962, with the last trolleybus conversion, were undoubtedly significant years, but it is hard to…
Automobiles in the past

Automobiles in the past

Steam-powered automobiles continued development all the way into the early 20th century, but the dissemination of petrol engines as the motive power of choice in the late 19th century marked the end of steam automobiles except as curiosities. Whether they will ever be reborn in later technological eras remains to be seen…