Vintage

New York World’s Fair in 1939

New York World’s Fair in 1939

The 1939–40 New York World’s Fair, which covered the 1,216 acres (492 ha) of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, was the second largest American world’s fair of all time, exceeded only by St. Louis’s Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. Many countries around the world participated in it, and over 44 million people attended its exhibits in two seasons. The NYWF of 1939–1940…
The FBI’s fingerprint files called ‘Notorious Dead Criminals’

The FBI’s fingerprint files called ‘Notorious Dead Criminals’

Filing doesn’t have to be dull. Here is the evidence — in more ways than one. These photos picture the FBI’s overflow filing system, housed during World War 2 in the Washington, D.C. Armory. By the early 1940s, the FBI’s archive housed more than 23 million card and 10 million fingerprint records, with 400,000 new cards added each and every…
Pasadena Police

Pasadena Police

Growing up with a father on the police force, William Valentine experienced a childhood slightly different from his peers. He observed life-threatening scenarios and witnessed his first dead body before the age of eight years old. Years later, in 1984, as a photography student at Arizona State University, he decided to turn his camera lens on the world he knew –…
Behind The Scenes: Steven Spielberg

Behind The Scenes: Steven Spielberg

Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946) is an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. Spielberg is consistently considered as one of the leading pioneers of the New Hollywood era, as well as being viewed as one of the most popular and influential filmmakers in the history of cinema. In a career spanning more than four decades, Spielberg’s films have covered…
Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968

Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968

On the night of 20–21 August 1968, the Soviet Union invaded the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic in order to halt Alexander Dubček’s Prague Spring political liberalisation reforms. In the operation, codenamed Danube, approximately 500,000 troops attacked Czechoslovakia. Approximately 500 Czechs and Slovaks were wounded and 108 killed in the invasion. The invasion successfully stopped the liberalisation reforms and strengthened the authority…
First Chechen War (1994–1996)

First Chechen War (1994–1996)

The First Chechen War, also known as the War in Chechnya, was a conflict between the Russian Federation and the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, fought from December 1994 to August 1996. After the initial campaign of 1994–1995, culminating in the devastating Battle of Grozny, Russian federal forces attempted to seize control of the mountainous area of Chechnya but were set…
Shanghai postcards from 1930s

Shanghai postcards from 1930s

For centuries a major administrative, shipping, and trading town, Shanghai grew in importance in the 19th century due to European recognition of its favorable port location and economic potential. The city was one of five opened to foreign trade following the British victory over China in the First Opium War while the subsequent 1842 Treaty of Nanking and 1844 Treaty…
Swedish life in the 1930s

Swedish life in the 1930s

Einar Erici was a skilful amateur photographer. His main motifs were churches and church organs, according to his field of science. The photos were taken during the first half of the 20th century on his travels across Sweden. Most of them are from the provinces of Gotland and Uppland. However, main focus of the set will be on another and…
The Days of Prohibition

The Days of Prohibition

Prohibition in the United States was a nationwide constitutional ban on the sale, production, importation, and transportation of alcoholic beverages that remained in place from 1920 to 1933. It was promoted by “dry” crusaders movement, led by rural Protestants and social Progressives in the Democratic and Republican parties, and was coordinated by the Anti-Saloon League, and the Woman’s Christian Temperance…
Broken Glass-Plate Portraits from Romania (1940s)

Broken Glass-Plate Portraits from Romania (1940s)

Amazing collection of broken glass-plate portraits by Romanian photographer Costică Acsinte. Costică Acsinte was born 4th of July, 1897 in a small village called Perieți, Ialomița County, Costică Acsinte fought in WWI. Despite his formation as a pilot, he was a official war photographer till 15th of June, 1920. As soon as the war was over he opened a studio…
High Life in Havana, Cuba

High Life in Havana, Cuba

It was during the presidency of Gerardo Machado in the ’20s that Cuba’s tourist trade really took off. Hotels, restaurants, night clubs, golf clubs and casinos sprung up in Havana catering to the rich jet-setters seeking luxury. Socialites, debutantes, celebrities like Ava Gardner and Frank Sinatra, and American mobsters came to play in the Cuban paradise. Tourism, and the growing and selling…
The Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building, originally the Fuller Building, is located at 175 Fifth Avenue in the borough of Manhattan, New York City, and is considered to be a groundbreaking skyscraper. Upon completion in 1902, it was one of the tallest buildings in the city and one of only two skyscrapers north of 14th Street – the other being the Metropolitan Life…
Coca-Cola Signs

Coca-Cola Signs

On January 31, 1893, Coca-Cola became a registered trademark, launching what would come to be one of the most recognized brands in the world. via Time
City life of Hong Kong in 1945

City life of Hong Kong in 1945

By the end of the war in 1945, Hong Kong had been liberated by joint British and Chinese troops. The population of Hong Kong had shrunk to 600,000; less than half of the pre-war population of 1.6 million due to scarcity of food and emigration. The communist revolution in China in 1949 led to another population boom in Hong Kong.…
Chicago’s first Hollywood premiere in 1940

Chicago’s first Hollywood premiere in 1940

Rain did not prevent thousands of Chicagoans from gathering on State Street on the night of Oct. 24, 1940, to catch a glimpse of Hollywood movie stars as they arrived for the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille’s film, “North West Mounted Police”, starring Gary Cooper and Madeleine Carroll. It was Chicago’s first Hollywood premiere and was held at both the…
The Edwardian era in the United Kingdom

The Edwardian era in the United Kingdom

Queen Victoria died in 1901 and her son Edward VII became king, inaugurating the Edwardian Era, which was characterised by great and ostentatious displays of wealth in contrast to the sombre Victorian Era. With the advent of the 20th century, things such as motion pictures, automobiles, and aeroplanes were coming into use. The new century was characterised by a feeling…
Images from “Safety Last!” (1923)

Images from “Safety Last!” (1923)

Safety Last! is a 1923 romantic comedy silent film starring Harold Lloyd. It includes one of the most famous images from the silent film era: Lloyd clutching the hands of a large clock as he dangles from the outside of a skyscraper above moving traffic. The film was highly successful and critically hailed, and it cemented Lloyd’s status as a major…
Grant Park in Chicago

Grant Park in Chicago

The city officially designated the land as a park on April 29, 1844, naming it Lake Park. When the Illinois Central Railroad was built into Chicago in 1852, it was permitted to lay track along the lakefront on a causeway built offshore from the park. The resulting lagoon became stagnant, and was largely filled in 1871 with debris from the…