1920s

Vintage: Cycling down the Eiffel Tower (1923)

Vintage: Cycling down the Eiffel Tower (1923)

In 1923, as France was recovering from the first World War, journalist Pierre Labric decided to ride a bicycle down the stairs from Level 1 of the Eiffel Tower (there are three levels). The Eiffel tower is 324 metres in height and was built in 1889 and was named after its engineer Gustave Eiffel who’s company built the tower. The…
Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Oskar Jarén was born in Kasper Borg Frinnaryd in 1877 and died in his hometown in 1954. In 1960s all of his 2,000 glass plates were rescued from oblivion with the help of Frinnaryds photoclub. This collection documents daily life in Sweden from between the 1910s and 1920s. via JÖNKÖPINGS LÄNS MUSEUM
Vintage: Aerial Boston (1920s)

Vintage: Aerial Boston (1920s)

The American Revolution erupted in Boston, as the British retaliated harshly for the Boston Tea Party and the patriots fought back. They besieged the British in the city, with a famous battle at Bunker Hill in Charlestown on June 17, 1775 (which was lost by the colonists, but inflicted great damage against the British) and won the Siege of Boston,…
Vintage: Building the Tyne Bridge (1927 to 1929)

Vintage: Building the Tyne Bridge (1927 to 1929)

The Tyne Bridge is one of the North East’s most iconic landmarks. These photographs were taken by James Bacon & Sons of Newcastle and document its construction from March 1927 to October 1928. They belonged to James Geddie, who was Chief Assistant Engineer on the construction of the Bridge with Dorman, Long & Co. Ltd. of Middlesbrough. Photos from the…
Vintage: U.S Airmail Service (1918-1927)

Vintage: U.S Airmail Service (1918-1927)

The first scheduled U.S. Air Mail service began on May 15, 1918, using six converted United States Army Air Service Curtiss JN-4HM “Jenny” biplanes flown by Army pilots under the command of Major Reuben H. Fleet and operating on a route between Washington, D.C. (Washington Polo Grounds) and New York City (Belmont Park) with an intermediate stop in Philadelphia (Bustleton…
Vintage: Portraits of First Miss Europe in 1929

Vintage: Portraits of First Miss Europe in 1929

Miss Europe was a first annual beauty pageant with female contestants from all over Europe. It was established in February 1929 by French journalist Maurice de Waleffe, who also created, in 1920, what by 1927 had become the Miss France pageant. Miss Europa was first held at the Paris Opera with participants from 18 countries. The most recent pageant was…
Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Vintage: Life in Sweden by Oskar Jarén (1910s-1920s)

Oskar Jarén was born in Kasper Borg Frinnaryd in 1877 and died in his hometown in 1954. In 1960s all of his 2,000 glass plates were rescued from oblivion with the help of Frinnaryds photoclub. This collection documents daily life in Sweden from between the 1910s and 1920s. via JÖNKÖPINGS LÄNS MUSEUM
Vintage: Panoramic photos of New Zealand by Robert Percy Moore (1920s)

Vintage: Panoramic photos of New Zealand by Robert Percy Moore (1920s)

Robert Percy Moore is considered to be New Zealand’s greatest panorama photographer. He travelled extensively photographing homesteads, public events, royal visits, groups, and urban and rural scenery. 2489 of his panoramic negatives are held at the Alexander Turnbull Library. During World War I he was a travelling photographer in Queensland producing postcard views.
Vintage: Hollywoodland Sign (1920s)

Vintage: Hollywoodland Sign (1920s)

The sign was first erected in 1923 and originally read “HOLLYWOODLAND.” Its purpose was to advertise the name of a new housing development in the hills above the Hollywood district of Los Angeles. H.J. Whitley had already used a sign to advertise his development Whitley Heights, which was located between Highland Avenue and Vine Street. He suggested to his friend…
Vintage: Chicago Union Station

Vintage: Chicago Union Station

The need for a single, centralized station was an important political topic in 19th and 20th-century Chicago, as various competing railroads had built a series of terminal stations. The numerous stations and associated railyards and tracks surrounded the city’s central business district, the Loop, and threatened its expansion. The various stations also made travel difficult for through-travelers, many of whom…