1910s

Vintage: New York’s Bohemian Greenwich Village (1910s – 1920s)

Vintage: New York’s Bohemian Greenwich Village (1910s – 1920s)

Jessie Tarbox Beals (1870 – 1942) was an American photographer, the first published female photojournalist in the United States mostly known for her portraits of places such as Bohemian Greenwich Village. Greenwich Village became widely identified as America’s bohemia by the mid-1910s. The radicals who lived in Greenwich Village in the early 20th century rejected traditional structured socialization, preferring instead…
Glass Plate Female Mugshots from Australia

Glass Plate Female Mugshots from Australia

In 1990 the Historic Houses Trust rescued a remarkable collection of NSW Police forensic photographs from a flooded warehouse in Lidcombe. Created between 1912 and 1964, the archive contains approximately 130,000 glass plate negatives depicting crime scenes, police activities, forensic evidence and mug shots and may be the biggest police photography collection in the southern hemisphere. The Historic Houses Trust…
Vintage: Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1915 expedition to the Antarctic

Vintage: Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1915 expedition to the Antarctic

Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874 – 1922) was a polar explorer who led three British expeditions to the Antarctic, and one of the principal figures of the period known as the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. Here is a collection of haunting photographs of Sir Ernest Shackleton and his crew’s struggle to survive against the odds in the big freeze of…
Vintage photos of Warsaw before World War 1914

Vintage photos of Warsaw before World War 1914

Warsaw has had a particularly tumultuous history for a European city. It experienced numerous plagues, invasions, and devastating fires. The most destructive events include the Deluge, the Great Northern War (1702, 1704, 1705), War of the Polish Succession, Warsaw Uprising (1794), Battle of Praga and the Massacre of Praga inhabitants, November Uprising, January Uprising, World War I, Siege of Warsaw…
Vintage Photos of Moscow in 1910s

Vintage Photos of Moscow in 1910s

After losing the status as capital of the empire, the population of Moscow at first decreased, from 200,000 in the 17th century to 130,000 in 1750. But after 1750, the population grew more than tenfold over the remaining duration of the Russian Empire, reaching 1.8 million by 1915.
Vintage: Paris Under Water (1910)

Vintage: Paris Under Water (1910)

The 1910 Great Flood of Paris was a catastrophe in which the Seine River, carrying winter rains from its tributaries, flooded Paris agglomeration, France. The Seine water level rose eight meters above the ordinary level. Winter floods were a normal occurrence in Paris but, on 21 January, the river began to rise more rapidly than normal. Over the course of…
Movie Theatre Etiquette Posters from 1912

Movie Theatre Etiquette Posters from 1912

The Library of Congress has a fascinating series of vintage movie theatre “etiquette” posters from 1912. At the time, films were silent as movies with sound didn’t become prevalent until the late 1920s. Sadly, a September 2013 report by the United States Library of Congress announced that a total of 70% of American silent films are believed to be completely…
Vintage: The Eastland disaster (1915)

Vintage: The Eastland disaster (1915)

A large crowd of horrified spectators watched as the S.S. Eastland – only a few feet from the shore of the Chicago River downtown — turned on its side. It was in just 20 feet of water, but that was deep enough to drown 844 people who were trapped or trampled below decks. via Chicago Tribune
Vintage: Russian air force of 1915

Vintage: Russian air force of 1915

The Imperial Russian Air Service was founded in 1912. At the beginning of World War I, Russia’s air service was second only to that of France (263 aeroplanes and 14 airships), although the bulk of its aircraft were too outdated to be of much use. via English Russia
Vintage: Imperial Russian Submarines (1910s)

Vintage: Imperial Russian Submarines (1910s)

Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) had purchased German constructed submersibles built by the Germaniawerft shipyards out of Kiel. In 1903 Germany successfully completed its first fully functional engine-powered submarine, Forelle (Trout), and it was sold to Russia in 1904 and shipped via the Trans-Siberian Railway to the combat zone during the Russo-Japanese War. Due to the naval blockade of Port Arthur,…
Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913

Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913

The Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 was the first suffragist parade in Washington, D.C.. Organized by the suffragist Alice Paul. The parade, calling for a constitutional amendment, featured 8,000 marchers, including nine bands, four mounted brigades, 20 floats, and an allegorical performance near the Treasury Building. Though the parade began late, it appeared to be off to a good start…
Vintage: Chicago’s 1919 race riot

Vintage: Chicago’s 1919 race riot

The riots began after an incident at a South side beach where an African-American teenager was killed, setting off five violence-filled days where dozens died and hundreds were injured. The rioting wasn’t quelled until Gov. Frank Lowden sent in 6,500 state militia troops to draw a line between the white and black districts. In the end, 23 African-Americans and 15…
The Boston Molasses Disaster of 1919

The Boston Molasses Disaster of 1919

The Boston Molasses Disaster occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States. A large molasses storage tank burst, and a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150. The event has entered local folklore, and for decades afterward, residents claimed…
Cats and Dogs Dressed as People (1910s)

Cats and Dogs Dressed as People (1910s)

Harry Whittier Frees (1879–1953) was an American photographer who created novelty postcards and children’s books based on his photographs of live, posed animals. He dressed the animals and posed them in human situations with props, often with captions; these can be seen as progenitors of modern lolcats.
Roy Repp and his Stunt Car

Roy Repp and his Stunt Car

Roy Repp was an Australian stunt driver. One of his stunt cars was Maude the Motor Mule. For this car, he would pull a lever, and a heavy weight beneath the car moves forward or backward to shift the center of gravity and makes the car rear up on its hind wheels or front wheels.   via Library of Congress
Rochester’s Great Flood of 1913

Rochester’s Great Flood of 1913

The winter had been unusually warm and rainy, and the ground already soaked to the max, when a powerful arctic weather system – stretching from Ontario down to the Gulf of Mexico – swept through. Beginning on Easter Sunday, March 23, the rains pounded all of upstate New York. Hurricane force winds and heavy sleet took down power and communication…